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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:37 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
We just bought a new house in Ellis County Texas and have used mostly native plants in our landscape. In the native soil (caliche), the plants are doing well, but in areas where top soil was brought in by the builder, I'm concerned. The drainage is poor and seems to stay moist.

My question: what plants can I use that will thrive in poor drainage? The imported soil is orange/red sandy with large clumps of gray clay. Kent

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Listen to Neil Sperry every week, take notes... and then do the exact opposite.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 5:21 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 11:48 am
Posts: 60
Location: Irving,TX
liriope (lilyturf)
dwarf Mexican petunia (ruellia)
irises
crepe myrtles

I have all of these in poorly draining soil. They all seem to love the excess water.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 5:31 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 11:48 am
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Location: Irving,TX
I thought of something to add...

cannalilys and callalilys

If the soil never dries out, you could use any pond plant where the planting depth says "marginal" or "shelf". Lowe's has a pretty good selection.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 7:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
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Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
Thanks, Susan. I like the idea of crepe myrtles and ruellia. Kent

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Listen to Neil Sperry every week, take notes... and then do the exact opposite.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2004 10:33 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 10:54 am
Posts: 133
Location: Dallas,TX
In addition to the moist soil, if you also have part shade to light shade, the umbrella plant would probably do well. The latin name is Cyperus alternifolius. It's a delightful, tropical looking plant that spreads over time. I cut mine back in winter and have fresh plants in the spring through fall.


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