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 Post subject: Hot peppers wanted
PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2003 7:50 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2003 6:57 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Huntington Texas
Can anybody tell me what are the factors that make a hot pepper hot? I have gottten several picking from my cayenne peppers and they are a disappointment. I usually notice that around Aug-Sept they start getting hot. Currently I have them planted in raised beds along with my tomatoes. Mixed in a commercial compost before planting .By the way I have jalopeno ,cayenne, habenero, bell peppers planted.


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 Post subject: hot peppers
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 1:38 pm 
Capsaicinoids are the active ingredients in peppers that make them hot.
Pure capsaicin is soluble only in alcohol - that's why drinking water doesn't alleviate the burn. (So I guess if you "bite off more than you can chew", drink a beer not water!).

Capsaicinoids have the unique ability to de-sensitize the taste buds with repeated exposure, so when people speak of spicy foods as being an acquired taste, there is some scientific proof for what they are saying. Capsaicinoids are also known to promote circulation and to help clean your body because they induce sweating. There are other health benefits as well.

The amount of capsaicins contained in the fruit tissues and seeds really depends mostly on the genetics of the pepper variety. Die-hard pepper growers insist that a warmer growing climate encourages hotter peppers. This would explain why your late-summer fall peppers would be hotter than your spring harvest. Some also argue that you need to grow different kind of peppers in different conditions: For example, the Tepin is a wild pepper that can grow without irrigation in dry climates, while the habaneros are all tropical wetland species that need a lot of watering. Supposedly, by growing each variety in an environment most like their native one, you'll get the hottest specimens.

Also, I know that harvest time makes a difference. If you pick your peppers too early, before they are fully ripe, they won't be as hot. Let them fully ripen and change color before you harvest.

Now, you folks can argue away!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 9:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2003 9:18 pm
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Location: McKinney,TEXAS
Hey Leslie, I'm not sure of the "rules of arguing on a forum", could you develop some now that you've given us permission?
A few other fun facts about hot peppers:
- Potato,tomato,petunia,eggplant, and tobacco are all in the same pepper family
- There is actually a scale developed to rate the heat intensity of peppers, it's called the Scoville Scale. 100% Pure Capaicin is 16,000,000 Scoville Units, a scotch bonnet habanero is about 300,000 units.
- The heat is is mostly concentrated in the veins of the pepper, although to a lesser degree, in the seeds as well
- When peppers are Dehydrated they tend to increase in "Heat" by about 10 times
-Water not only doesn't tame the burn, it spreads it! Dairy products contain a chemical called Casein which is THE Best thing known to break down the heat and the Oil Capsaicin.
Tony M


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2003 2:58 pm 
Tony - I agree - drying the peppers will increase their "heat". I forgot to mention that in my first post.

Yeah, I almost didn't touch this one because there are SO many differing opinions on the topic. Have you ever visited a board devoted specifically to hot peppers?? If not, be sure to put on your head gear first! Well, I could create a "boxing club" forum, devoted specifically to those topics that folks want to duke it out over!! Until that becomes necessary, you may argue, but you have to argue nice! OH, and you can't argue with me, I forgot that rule..... :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2003 7:28 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2003 6:57 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Huntington Texas
After being quite disappointed with my first few pickings, I decided to leave the peppers on the plant longer to ripen alittle more. It seems to be working better. Also my pepper plants labeled Cayenne turned out to be Cowhorn peppers. :shock: I'm awaiting blistered lips, so I'll go hose down the Habenero's :D :wink: Thanks for the input.


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 Post subject: Hot Peppers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 5:40 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2003 5:19 pm
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Location: Ft. Worth
I'm by no means an expert, however I've heard this tip and am trying it this year. The less water and more magnesium (epsome salt) in the soil the hotter the pepper. I have separated a few out to try this out. No fruit yet but I'm hoping for a big difference in heat.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 7:31 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2003 9:18 pm
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Location: McKinney,TEXAS
melisa-
Thank you for your input and thank you for volunteering to run an experiment and share it with us. It's always nice to hear people's stories and thoughts but a good old fashion trial works for me.
Tony M


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