It is currently Wed Aug 31, 2016 9:46 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 12:22 pm
Posts: 129
Location: Frisco, Tejas
So when my wife and I met our house a couple years ago we loved it... my wife was trying to keep a serious expression while talking to the realtor... daughter and I were running around shouting "We're HOME!". The one killer - no room for my garden!

...or so some would think. We live in Frisco and it's a typical Frisco lot... big house on a postage stamp. The backyard would not work, big pool back there and a lot of patio plus a little grass for the dogs to bomb... so, no room for a garden.

Well, wait now... there was a little room between our driveway and the neighbor's fence. Hmmmmm..... Three years later, here's my answer to the no room issue:
Image
Image
Image

Now it is not ideal - I'd like to have more sun available but on the other hand it is more protected. I put a gate on one end of the house and the little garden fence you can see on the other.
The soil was - c***, and not the good kind. Builders sand and bricks beneath a layer of sod. I raised it by a foot one one side, closer to two on the other, leveled it, pulled out the bricks and trash and dumped in a load of Living Earth Technologies soil (manure, greensand, shale etc) plus a LOT of compost. In year one I only did a third of it while covering the rest with a ton of hardwood mulch that I let break down.

Anyway, as you can see from the pictures, despite the lack of "sufficient" sun, room, etcetera I produce a lot of tomatoes, peppers, herbs, squash, eggplant and other organic goodies. It's enough that I send out emails to the neighbors telling them to PLEASE come get what I can't eat.

So - if, according to the 'rules' you don't have the space and sun to do a garden by the book I just wanted to suggest to you that there is such a thing as ideal space but never let that stop you. Good soil and a lot of hard work can make just about any plot sufficient for a veggie garden!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:45 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1834
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Another "edible estate" in the making! I also have gardens along either side of my driveway. Not because there is no sun in the back, there is, but I have dogs back there and they're kind of hard on the garden. And the front yard is also where I've planted tomatoes and cantaloupe. Each year I push more of it into edible plantings.

http://www.fritzhaeg.com/garden/initiatives/edibleestates/austin.html

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 1:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 8:35 am
Posts: 102
Great Job and thanks for the pictures! Earlier this week, I decided to foodscape my front beds--I just think winter greens are so pretty. I've been taking pictures and hope to put them up next week (too busy now).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 5:50 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1834
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Those aren't my photos, that's a guy from Austin who has been making a big push to have more people
put in gardens instead of turf.

I regularly have neighbors who will ask for cuttings from one of the herbs out there. Since most of it is so
plentiful that its practically wild, I've told them to just come cut it when they need it. I do see strangers
walking past every so often stop and break off a rosemary twig from the plant down at the street. That's
fine! (It's nice to know they notice it!)

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 12:22 pm
Posts: 129
Location: Frisco, Tejas
LOL - wife and I laugh when we catch the two legged rabbits walking down the alley with veggies and herbs. Makes me happy to see others enjoy it because let's face it, I can't really eat 27000 tabasco peppers by myself.

...and what an easy way to get someone interested in organics when they discover that the tomatoes are tangier, the basil is zestier and the jalapenos will burn the fire out of you. Folks who are used to grocery store produce flip when they find out how veggies should taste.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 1:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun May 23, 2010 11:31 am
Posts: 12
nice!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 9:29 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1834
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
I have a gazillion volunteer tomato plants coming up in my veggie bed, and this weekend
I was working on a new bed that will run along the curb down at the street. I'm going to
transplant some of these volunteers and snake a soaker hose through the bed, then mulch
the whole thing. I hope neighbors will stop to pick, though I expect I'll still have a lot of
tomatoes to harvest. There are several folks who I regularly visit with on their evening
walks who will know that they are welcome to pick what they need. I may put out a little
sign "pick what you can use today or tomorrow, and come back for more later." Or something
to that effect.

One of these families that walks regularly is an interesting trio, and they provided one of the
many reasons why one must "never assume" about people's foodways or cultures. The Mexican
father is interested in cactus pads, but one day we were talking about my extra rosemary.
I asked if he'd like some. "Yes! I could use it when I cook lamb," he responded.

My ears perked up. Lamb in Mexican cooking? What new wonderful dish could I learn about?
I asked him how he uses lamb. Turns out he spend 20 years in Chicago and learned to love
lamb in the various other ethnic food cultures found there. Probably similar to my favorite lamb
dishes I learned in New York City. :)

I'd guess his son was about six years old last summer when they stopped on one of their evening
walks to talk. I invited them up to the driveway tomato patch and had the son pick a very large
ripe juicy tomato to take home for dinner. This child was clearly pleased to get to pick such a
large red tomato, and he said he liked them. Now, I'm not worried that a seven-year-old (this year)
is going to raid my tomatoes when I'm not looking. But I won't be surprised, next time we visit, to
learn that they are growing some of their own tomatoes.

I made an arrangement with my next door neighbor. She had trouble growing okra when she planted
it, but she loves it. I grew up in Seattle, and to me, okra is a foreign dish from the get-go. I
planted a couple of okra plants right along my fence (next to her yard, and she can see it from
her kitchen window). I told her she is welcome to (and please do!) come pick those okra when they're
ready, and the only request I have is that she teach me how to cook okra. Preferably not boiled. But
whatever. I'm game, I want to see how this grows, and she can use it. She's a good cook, and I'd
like to learn to use this vegetable.

Isn't gardening great? It's like an outpost of the United Nations in your neighborhood. :)

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by eWeblife