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PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2003 6:38 pm 
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Location: Lavon,Texas
:cry: The one Habanero pepper plant in my garden is shriveling up and looks to be dieing, since the start of all the rain we have been having. Does any one know if this is a case of habanero peppers not liking "wet feet"? My garden has not had a chance to dry out before the next rain storm. The rest of the plants, tomatoes, bell peppers and cucumbers are doing excellent. I looked under the leaves and don't see any critters or scale. This is my first year growing these kind of pepper.
When I planted the garden, I put a 4-5 inch thick layer of cut grass to use as mulch. It is now down to about 1 inch with all the decomposition so I was thinking when I can mow again to add another layer to it.

Greg...

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 Post subject: pepper diseases
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 1:05 pm 
While there are many viruses that can harm peppers, the following are the most prevalent in North America.

Tobacco Mosaic Virus--Leaves become yellow and a mosaic pattern can be seen on them. Eventually plants become stunted and fruit discolored. Because TMV can be found in tobacco, refrain from smoking near the plants. Do not handle plants after smoking tobacco. Many pepper varieties have resistance or tolerance to Tobacco Mosaic Virus.


Wilt diseases
--These are caused by the fungi Verticilium and Fusarium present in the soil. The initial symptoms are wilting, upward curling of leaves, and yellowing. Eventually the stems and roots of the plant are affected. Verticilium wilt is more common in the western and northern parts of North America. Fusarium wilt is more likely to occur under conditions of wet soil and high temperatures.

Phytophthora root rot is caused by organisms found in heavy, poorly drained soils. These diseases are best prevented by good water management and crop rotation.

Cucumber Mosaic Virus--Plants are severely stunted with light green, leathery foliage. Leaves and fruit may develop yellow spots and rings. This virus is worldwide and can infect many food crops and weeds. Aphids can transmit CMV from weeds to vegetables and back to weeds.

Viruses and wilts are not very common in gardens. But, because of the symptoms you describe, it sounds like that might be your problem. If a pepper plant appears to have the symptoms of a wilt or virus, the only action to take is to remove and destroy the plant.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 5:02 pm 
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Location: Lavon,Texas
Thanks Leslie for the information. I believe the problem may be Phytophthora root rot, since the garden has not had enough time to dry between all the rain storms we have been having.

Greg

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