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PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2003 10:29 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:23 am
Posts: 1
Location: Fort Worth
We have several tomatoes and a jungle of cucumber vines. The tomatoes look poor, as I guess they are supposed to(?) at this time of year, but there is fruit and it is ripening. The bottoms of the plants look pitiful, but the new growth at the top is nice and green, and the blight isn't getting there too fast.

We have been overwhelemd by cucumbers up until the last week or so, but the end growth on the vines looks great - very dark green and vigorous.

My question is - for a fall garden, can we nurse these plants through the rest of July and August, and will they then produce more, or is it better to finish harvesting the remaining fruit as it ripens, then make a large offering to the compost pile and replant with new plants? Do the old plants peter out after a while?

How about peppers (jalapenos, banana and bell)? Will these plants produce any more after we harvest the fruit that is on right now? We don't see any new flowers currently.

Thanks for any thoughts or comments.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2003 8:52 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2003 12:12 pm
Posts: 110
Location: Garland
I don't know what the standard advice is, but I replant pretty much everything around this time. Tomatoes, peppers, squash, you name it. my cantaloupe is still there, but it takes a long time to harvest. Iwould harvest what you can and start over...

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2003 8:24 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 20, 2003 4:33 pm
Posts: 526
Location: parker county, texas
I'm going to do both. I have several tomato seedlings that I recently transplated, and I'll leave about half of my large plants in place. The squash is starting to give out, and I have planted new ones, same with the cucumbers. I'll plant corn in about a month or so, and green beans too. You can pretty much do what you want, but I do suggest having at least some of your Fall garden in young plants for better production.


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 Post subject: Tomato Blight
PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 4:43 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
You can really help your existing plants by adding cornmeal to the soil. I have been doing this for 3 years and eliminated the blight problem. If you will add 2 cups per plant, work it into the top layer of soil and water it in your plants will feel better quick. When you do plant the fall garden, add cornmeal in and just watch the difference. And don't forget to foliar feed. They benefit so much from it, especially now!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 7:06 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2003 8:39 pm
Posts: 532
Location: Lavon,Texas
I have one habinero pepper plant that I am going to try to save by digging it up and put in a pot for winter. This way I can prepare my garden soil, or should I say black clay, with mass amounts of compost and tilling in. I hope next year the black clay will start to change to crumbly soil that worms like. I currently have big cracks in the garden, just like in the lawn. I have to be careful not to fall into one of the cracks when working in the garden. Guess I should tie a rope around me and attach to the compost bin, just in case I fall in. That way I can climb up the rope and out. (LOL) Good luck and best wishes to everyone with their fall gardens. Next year I will try two gardens, spring and fall.

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Converting one person at a time to Organics, the only way to go!! [ ME ]


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2003 11:36 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2003 9:50 pm
Posts: 59
Location: DFW
Quote:
Guess I should tie a rope around me and attach to the compost bin, just in case I fall in.

:lol: :lol: Oh that was a funny image in my head.


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 Post subject: To Plant New or not?
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2003 10:20 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 10:53 am
Posts: 21
Location: Austin, Texas
Some tomato varieties keep going til freeze for me, especially cherry tomatoes and some of the heirlooms. Peppers and eggplants also make it to a freeze and beyond if I cover them. Regular feedings and a well balanced soil make the difference in whether they make it to fall or not. Squash, green beans, cukes usually need replanting because they are pooped out from disease or insects usually, despite their feeding schedule.
They do so much better in the fall garden anyway, once you get them germinated in this intense heat, and insects and disease don't seem to be as much of a problem in the fall. I usually end up taking out plants that are doing well becuase I need the room for greens and lettuce!
Trisha


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