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PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2003 1:12 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2003 9:37 am
Posts: 28
Location: Frisco,TEXAS
I am building a new house in Frisco, and I'm trying to figure out where in the yard will be the best place for herbs and where I should put a small vegetable patch. This is all new to me.

I've studied the position of the house, garage, and fences and I've looked up the angles of the sun in summer and winter. I've figured out that the dead center of the yard will get as much sun as anything could want, but everywhere else is going to get some shade some part of the day some parts of the year. Towards winter with the sun low in the sky, some parts of my yard that I'd thought would be great for growing are going to get barely any sun at all, maybe just a few hours around noon.

So what do I do with this information? I want to grow basic herbs like oregano, basil, cilantro, and rosemary, plus garlic and onions, and maybe tomatos and peppers. I can read the label on a plant that says it requires "full sun" or tolerates "partial shade" but I don't know how to figure the seasonal aspect into this. Does full sun mean full winter sun? Will some of these plants be dormant in the winter, so only summer sun matters?

I'd appreciate your advice,

--Bill


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 Post subject: Where to Plant...
PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2003 10:09 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
My oregano gets morning sun and afternoon shade in both summer and winter and grows just fine. Thyme will do the same. Basil will burn with too much sun except in the cool weather, will freeeze in winter and can't take the really hot summer here well without getting bitter. Luckily, if you allow some to go to seed it will reseed pretty easily, or mine does anyway, and grow again in the fall. Same with cilantro. Rosemary is evergreen and loves the sun. Mine always flowers too. Garlic will freeze to the ground and then recover when warm weather returns and remember to harvest it before it flowers unles you want to save some seeds. We put out onion sets in early spring here & harvest before they flower. Never tried any in fall. Tomatoes and peppers love the heat and need lots of sun but both will freeze when we hit the low temps. All of these plants will benefit greatly from foliar feeding. Hope this is helpful! :D


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2003 4:09 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2003 9:37 am
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Location: Frisco,TEXAS
That's exactly the information I was looking for, thank you Kathe.

It sounds like Basil and Cilantro have a real hard time in Texas. Would they do better indoors?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2003 8:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 20, 2003 4:33 pm
Posts: 526
Location: parker county, texas
Most of the herbs I have grown will tolerated the heat and full sun, but like Kathy said, cilantro will bolt and flower, so you won't get much production of usable leaves. I have not had problems with basil in full sun as long as I water adequately. I suggest putting the tomatoes and peppers where they will get sun in the morning and early afternoon, with shade in the late afternoon. They will survive in full sun, but seem to do much better with relief from the extreme heat of July and Aug. If you like spinach, greens, peas, and snow peas, you can garden in Fall and Winter here.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2003 2:53 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 12, 2003 2:00 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Zone 4 South Dakota
I like to plant my herbs where they will be handy while cooking. My herbs are in full sun next to the sidewalk just off the deck off the kitchen door. That way if I'm cooking something, I can do a quick run outside and grab whatever I need. I live in zone 4 so I don't know about year-round gardening thing. I usually have a couple of tomato and pepper plants nearby too. It makes it easy to just go out and grab a tomato off the vine to slice in the salad. That's another thing that grows next to the sidewalk--salad greens. Love to come home from work and pick my supper on the way to the house. I don't use any pesticides ar herbicides on my garden so all it needs is a quick rinse and its ready to eat.

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 Post subject: Basil & Cilantro
PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2003 10:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
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Location: Dallas,TX
Basil does well until it gets really hot here, or in the fall until it freezes. I definitely agree that good watering and shelter from the really hot part of the day helps it last longer, and a cover will stretch it out in the fall. I use the leaves to cook as I need them and dry a few for when it does die out then let some flower to seed my next batch. Cilantro is the same, fine until it gets hot and then it bolts and gets bitter. Doesn't seem to reseed as well as the basil, though. Probably my fault somehow! :D
I definitely agree that having the herb garden right outside the kitchen door is best but if you can't do that for some reason just having them is heavenly! I love to use my fresh herbs, veggies & greens for dinner! Enjoy! :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2003 9:57 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2003 1:52 pm
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Location: Dallas,TEXAS
I have 8 basil plants, both sweet and thai, that I planted this spring and they are still thriving (I live in Dallas). They get full sun until about 5 in the evening. They did fine through the summer if they are watered frequently. They show their need by having droopy leaves. We would soak them (about 15 minutes per plant) every 3 days. My husband harvests the tops every 3 weeks or so to make fresh pesto. This keeps the plant smaller and bushy. Without pruning or harvesting basil can get tall and gangly.

We also have a small herb garden in the front on the North side of the house. It's in the shade until late afternoon, early evening. Im growing oregano, thyme, chives, rosemary, cilantro, sage and have 2 large bay plants. They're all doing very well and I noticed last night that the rosemary has started to bloom. The only one that looks stressed is the sage and I think it's because it needs a little more sun than the others.

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