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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 6:27 am 
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Location: Georgetown,TEXAS
A couple of gardeners have recommended that I cut back my indeterminate tomatoes at some point in the summer after the major spring/sunmer production cycle, once it's so hot they're not producing anymore, I guess, so they'll come back again and begin producing in the fall. Is this the thing to do? Or just shade them and leave them alone? What do you know about this? Thanks!


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 10:21 am 
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I did that last year - it didn't work well. I think this year I'll replant for fall. Some years cutting back seems to work, or just leaving them alone. But my tomatoes get so huge that it is a tangle, so I'm planning to replant and keep a bit more control of the space.

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 7:57 am 
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All indeterminate tomatoes get extremely long. Mine went up 7' to the top of a support my husband made, and back down 7'. If you don't want something that big, plant a determinate tomato like Celebrity. They get about 3'x3'.

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 12:49 pm 
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I don't care what they look like - I just want the tomatoes! I always plant indeterminate, usually Super Fantastic and a type or two of cherry tomatoes. But the question here is, will the spring planting of indeterminate tomatoes produce much of a crop in the fall after the heat of the summer. I didn't have much luck last year when I kept the same plants and trimmed them back a bit. Sometimes leaving them alone and letting that crop grow at the end of the plants is all that is needed, but it doesn't always work. Planting new in July means a fresh crop on less stressed and/or stretched out plants come fall.

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 5:37 am 
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I always plant a new crop by mid-July.

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