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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:20 pm 
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Location: Garland,TEXAS
does anyone know anything about this tomato. I have no flowers but a beautify plant...is it a very late tomato or what?

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Hi, I finally gave up on getting well enough to grub in the dirt so I have brought the dirt up to my level--had a ball--looking forward to next season!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2011 7:44 pm 
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Location: Gatesville, Tx
Being a new forum user and a burgeoning organic gardener, I am finding many interesting topics here. I am interested in heirloom vegetables, so I deciced to try Mr. Stripey. As the previous forum member posted six years ago, my plant looks very healthy but has very few blossoms. My next door neighbor- who has gardened in Cental Texas for years- has said he has never had any luck with this variety. Has any one else had success with Mr. Stripey?


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 11, 2011 6:09 am 
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When was it planted, how often do you fertilize and how much sun does it get?

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2011 10:24 am 
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I grew Mr. Stripey for the first time this year.

Planted Bonnie brand plants in early spring and Mr. Stripey has out preformed Celebrity, from Bonnie, and Delicious. I grew the Delicious from Ferry Morse seed. Mr. Stripey is a keeper.

This tomato is indeterminate. Very indeterminate. They have become monsters. They made tomatoes from late spring up to about the time temps got into the 100s. Right now, they are putting out vegetative growth, but no flowers. Certainly no toms. I've cut them back from the peppers and will let them go till the cold kills them. Maybe they'll make a second time.

I've already saved seed from them. First time doing that with a tom. It was easy to get the seeds, because...

This tom is more meat than snot. If you want a tomato to eat more than to drink, this is that. The meat is firm but soft, not crispy like a tomato flavored cucumber. The flavor is tomato. That's what it tastes like. A tomato. Not bitter at all either, like those crispy meat salad tomatoes. Mr.Stripey tastes good. Great on a burger.

Oh, this is in the DFW.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2011 8:41 pm 
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Location: Gatesville, Tx
Could you tell me when you planted your Mr. Stripey plant? I also bought the Bonny Brand, planted it in late April and it is still producing blooms but none have turned to tomatoes.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 1:56 pm 
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Mid April.

If yours haven't made, it may be too hot now. Folks who call in are mostly saying their toms are done for now. Dirt Doctor says we may get a second harvest in the fall from plants that make it.

I used Lady Bug brand ferts this year and everything really did well. If it were me, and it kinda is cause I'm limping mine along, I'd water enough to keep them going through summer and water them with the Lady Bug in early fall. You can use it any time really. I just think you'll get the most out of it later, unless you're going to use it the whole time from now til you take the toms down. That won't hurt any.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 17, 2011 4:01 pm 
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Location: Hill Country
Kat:

It may be that you have to wait for cooler temps now...

There are different factors involved to flowers making fruit (some times it's a soil fertility issue)

Do you have yours mulched? I'm eluding that this would make them produce, but anything you can do to reduce the soil temperature during the summer, will be of benefit.

Lastly, while you don't want your ground too wet, you do need some good even watering. When I slacked off of water for about four days, I noticed I lost some blooms.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 3:26 pm 
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Location: Gatesville, Tx
Well...I wish I had checked this thread before I went out to the garden this morning. Having had plenty of blooms in June and July but no fruit, I pulled Mr. Stripey and added him to the compost pile. Seems by what folks are saying here, patience for a while longer may have seen the plant produce. I may try this heirloom again next year, but a tomato I will always plant is the Juliet tomato. My one Juliet plant outperformed all my other tomatos- Husky, Celebrity and Mr. Stripey- combined!


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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 8:43 am 
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Location: Gatesville, Tx
I thought I would add to this thread after going to a local nursery. I mentioned I have not had any luck with the Mr. Stripey tomato. The employee working in the section didn't hesitate and asked if I had planted marigold near this tomato. I had indeed planted marigold in my tomato beds and guess what? One of the marigolds was planted right next to Mr. Stripey. Has any else ever heard of this happening?


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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 9:08 am 
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What happening? I plant marigolds and other flowers in the vegetable garden to help attract pollinators. Tomatoes are pollinated via wind, though, is my understanding. Or by my hand and a Q-tip if production slows and when it's hot weather.

Does this person think marigolds are a good thing or a bad thing? Does he/she see a casual effect when perhaps there is none?

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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 9:18 am 
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I will be visting that nursery again today. I hope to see the same employee so I can ask her for more detail. From what I've read about companion planting, marigolds and tomatoes are supposed to do well together. I will post the employee's explanation as soon as I can.


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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 10:07 am 
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My marigolds always end up being covered over by the tomato branches after a while. I think they look pretty at the end of the row, but I probably started doing it based on a book I read years ago called "Carrots Love Tomatoes."

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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 8:43 pm 
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You should plant your tomatoes by the end of March and watch for freezes to protect them. That way you get fruit by the end of May thru about July. All tomatoes shut down in the hottest part of the summer and will flower again in late summer for a fall harvest. Feed them now every 3 weeks and even moisture. Alway, always mulch. I shake my tomato cages a couple of weeks after they start to blooms and a week later my tomatoes start to set. It never fails for me.

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