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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:38 am 
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Hello I am new to this board and have enjoyed all the info,I started growing organic hay this year but my question is after cutting the bermuda hay can I spray 2 gal. of mollasses on it and does it need rain to put it in the ground and then later on after the grass has come up about 4 or 5 inches spray it again as a foliar feed? Also in late winter I hate to say it but I always sprayed roundup on it too kill off the ryegrass and any other winter grass before the bermuda grass greened up,because I dig sprigs off of it and I need pure bermuda grass will it be alright to spray it with vinegar? Also tell me more about the use of baking soda to kill off crab grass,at what rate and at what time. Sorry for all the questions but I could talk all day long on bermuda grass. Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 11:03 pm 
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Lots of great questions. I have the opposite problem--I spend all of my waking gardening hours trying to kill off Bermuda grass. :(

I did some research last winter to learn more about the coastal hay that I buy to put in my dogs' kennel. It turns out this is the same Bermuda you're growing. I think I inadvertently end up "sprigging" my own garden by putting it down as a mulch in there. Interesting little clumps of this grass come up in the garden. I'll probably stop using that, and try some other mulching material instead. The grass that comes up in the garden is a nicer one than the stuff the creeps in from the turf. It's easier to pull out and doesn't seem to develop seed heads.

Anyway, I came to realize that I was probably using grass in my dog beds and on the garden that has been treated with herbicides. Not good! I will follow this thread with interest, to see if there is advice out there to help you grow an organic crop. Have other growers done this successfully, and where do they sell it? It's something I'd be in the market for (only a bale at a time, but every little sale helps, doesn't it?)

Here's a link to a page where someone with similar goals is discussing their field. Maybe it's a starting place in your search. http://cnrit.tamu.edu/discussion/cgrm/messages/2/909.html?1182093375 I retraced my earlier search to find this. I hope Howard has a lot more of an answer for you.

Good luck!

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2009 2:23 pm 
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Yes to all the molasses questions.

Yes to the vinegar questions.

Baking soda really only works on St Augustine turf. St Augustine is so salt tolerant that it can still thrive with the direct dusting of baking soda on the blades. Bermuda cannot.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2009 8:08 pm 
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Thank ya'll for the advice,when I sell my hay I tell people that I am fertilizing with organic fertilizer and trying to avoid using chemicals some like the idea and act like they never thought about it and some act like "so what" oh well more people need to be educated about it I guess. Do you think this is a good plan for the molasses?I have been using a product called Monty's liquid carbon for humate and it is only 12% need to do somemore research and see if it is organic. Also at what rate do I need to spray the vinegar and amount of water per acre to kill the ryegrass and early weeds in late winter? Well that is enough of questions for now but I will have more coming I am sure and maybe one day I might be able to educate someone else. Thanks


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2009 10:46 pm 
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I can't get specific to rye grass, but in general Howard recommends 10% as plenty strong enough as an herbicide. The grocery store strength (5%) isn't enough and anything over 10% he says is overkill. If you're using large quantities, you obviously want it strong enough to do the job, but buying it stronger than you need is going to cost a lot more.

Have you read through the Library entries for grasses and vinegar? And in particular, take a look at the recommendations as to WHEN to put out vinegar and corn gluten meal to keep the spring weeds under control. Corn gluten meal can act as an herbicide if used in winter (Howard has recommended an application between xmas and new years, except last year was so warm that didn't quite work).

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 9:46 am 
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I was wondering why you are trying to kill off rye grass from a hay pasture, I will be planting rye grass and clover mix next week in my hay pasture. Rye grass is a wonderful natural weed deterrent, and the clover adds more nitrogen and both add organic matter to the soil for the Microbes to eat and turn into nutrients for the Bermuda next year. I have spot sprayed Bahia grass with vinegar with wonderful results. The best weed control is a healthy soil!!!
Good Luck,
Bradley
www.WatsonRanchOrganic.com


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2009 8:15 pm 
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You can use molassess as a ground or folair treatment. I always spray my coastal fields after the grass has grown 4-6 inches. It lets the leaves take up what the plant needs and if it rains the rest goes in the ground. Montys products are not a true organic product. I started using the Waston Ranch Products and have had excellent results.

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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 10:01 am 
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those interested in growing hay organically might be interested in a Texas A&M study that was started in 2009. The study was conducted in Wood County and a copy can be obtained via Clint Perkins at the Ag Extension office in Quitman, Tx.
Of the 13 enrolled, several were using various chemical inputs, urea, etc. while we furnished organic products. The results were very interesting even though my offerings were mis-applied which added to the total cost of the 3 application study. We smoked them all.
Organicmktcenter@aol.com


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:04 am 
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ranchcop wrote:
I was wondering why you are trying to kill off rye grass from a hay pasture, I will be planting rye grass and clover mix next week in my hay pasture. Rye grass is a wonderful natural weed deterrent, and the clover adds more nitrogen and both add organic matter to the soil for the Microbes to eat and turn into nutrients for the Bermuda next year. I have spot sprayed Bahia grass with vinegar with wonderful results. The best weed control is a healthy soil!!!
Good Luck,
Bradley
http://www.WatsonRanchOrganic.com


Hi ... I tried spraying Bahia with agricultural vinegar in my coastal fields but noticed no effect. What are the details of your successful spot spraying? Thanks for the info on rye grass and clover. I try to remove those since I have pregnant mares eating my hay and both those plants can harbor dangerous organisms.


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