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 Post subject: Pond Organics
PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2003 3:57 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2003 3:49 pm
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Location: Grandview
I have recently bought 30 acres with a pond that is approx. 3/4 acre. I was wondering if anyone has any information on organic fertilizers for ponds. I do not use chemicals and there has got to be someone in the DFW are that hopefully will know. Any response would be appreciated.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2003 8:45 pm 
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Location: McKinney,TEXAS
I have owned or helped manage several ponds, there is a lot to know depending on what condition your pond is in (old/new, muddy/clear, deep/shallow, etc). I would recommend a web site that also has a magazine called the pond boss. http://www.pondboss.com/ These folks manage and consult on ponds all over the USA but they operate out of Whitesboro, TX. so I know they are familar with TX ponds. I have called and got free advice over the phone several times. Also, I can recommend a man called the "lake doctor" who has been building and treating lakes for 20 years. I don't think either of these recommendations is totally organic so you will have to get the expertise you need and supplement it with organic methods and inputs. For example, the slope of a pond bank has nothing to do with organics but has a lot to do with how many pond weeds and algae you will have that would require a herbicide treatment.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2003 8:56 am 
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Location: Grandview
Thank you Tony. We have already subscribed to Pond Boss magazine. It seems as though they only use chemicals in their ponds. Our pond is fairly old and we are trying to clean it up. The water is alwayd murky. We have some perch and bass, but they are all fairly small. In the deepest part, it is 10 ft. deep. I didn't know if there was someone who dealt strictly in organics for ponds. Thank you for your help. I will check out the "lake doctor" and see where that leads me.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2003 2:36 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 3:30 pm
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Location: Wylie
Let me know what you think of the lake dr. My parents have a pond that needs some serious help..

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Jeff - Wylie, Texas


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2003 9:15 pm 
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The lake doctor is Mark Palmer, he lives in Celina. I'm sure he would not appreciate me saying this but he is notoriously tardy. It is hard to get in touch with him and he is usually backed up. BUT, I like the work he does, he is extremly knowledgeable and can handle almost everything, including 220 electric that is required to drive pond fountains and lights. I almost bought a piece of property with a beautiful pond covering about 3 acres. Mark quickly pointed out several problems and said it would be almost dry by summer. I passed on the property but drove back in the summer. Guess what!
The other folks I have used are Magnolia fisheries. They have been reliable but I'm not sure they are as cost effective. I know this is probably not good info to pass on but it's hard to find someone who is good with ponds at all levels (no pun intended) As you've heard Howard say, "sounds like a good business opportunity for someone".


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2003 8:50 am 
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Bluestem-
Good points. The windmill is one of the best things overall you can do for your pond. It is not a cure all. It sounds like a scam of sorts because it is not that prevalent in farm ponds but the people you have them are happy. I never got to that stage but I was looking.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 7:48 pm 
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Location: Wylie
How can i get in touch w/ the lawn dr.

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Jeff - Wylie, Texas


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2003 10:27 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:48 pm
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Location: Buffalo (midway between Dallas and Houston)
There's a kind of fish that eats only/mostly the vegetation out of the pond. If I remember correctly, they're called grass carp. However, you have to have a gov't permit as if they multiply too much they can cause undesirable effects on the pond. A fishery told us that the grass carp they sold were sterilized, but you still have to have a permit just the same.

banot


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2003 7:39 pm 
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Jeff- I assume you mean the lake doctor. I can't find his business card right now but his name is Mark Palmer and he lives in celina, TX. You might try there first and let me know if you are unsuccessful.
Tony


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2003 8:47 pm 
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Banot-
The grass carp you spoke about are just that, grass eating carp, or more specifically, white amur. They are native to china and were brought here to clear vegetation from lakes and ponds. They require a permit from TP&W who will come out to your pond, inspect it and issue the permit. I got a permit for 8 fish (4 fish / acre was the allowance at the time) but had to screen off the overflow to prevent them from escaping. All the fish are sterile but so were the hybrid stripped bass stocked in Lake Ray Hubbard that are reproducing as we type. Because of oddities like that, they are xtra careful. Our fish got to be about 30-40 lbs but were not able to keep up with the vegetation. Our pond had silted in badly and was factory for green growth. The carp are not carnivors so don't worry about losing bass or brim fingerlings.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 04, 2004 5:03 pm 
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Thanks for the information about farm "ponds"--we call them "tanks". We have a four year old tank which is fed by a mostly non-running stream/branch and some springs. We have been overrun with duckweed and have lost all or most of the channel cat,etc that we've stocked in the last four years. (No cattle use the tank). It really hurts to see those twenty pound catfish dead on the bank. We are seriously considering stepping way over the line and using very expensive chemicals (Reward and one other). [/b]We tried cornmeal, mistakenly thinking it was an algae. Also sprayed about 15 gallons of three percent hydrogen peroxide and even some bleach. Also we're considering the the triploid carp! We think we need to do something to manage all the organic matter that comes from the oaks that shade the quarter mile stream and the runoff from neighbor's chenically fertilized coastal fields! Would it help to trim trees to allow more sunlight on the branch?
We realize from the reading that we've done that probably the best we can hope for is control! Sure hate to lose this beautiful area for fishing. Thanks for any help and suggestions you can give us!


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