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 Post subject: Pasture rebuilding
PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 10:28 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 10:10 am
Posts: 3
Location: Ennis,TEXAS
I am new to list, although I must admit I've been lurking in the wings and have much enjoyed the information shared here on this site.

My wife and I purchased about 100 acres almost two years ago, down in Navarro County.
The land has been severely over grazed and no improvements whatsoever had taken place over the last 10 years or more. We just about have everything ready to begin sprigging a couple of 20 acre pastures with coastal bermuda and would like some recommendations of how to go about making sure that that grass will take off.
We raise miniture cows, Dexters, so we don't need alot of hay or grass just enough to keep them happy and healthy.

Thank you for any suggestions, you might have.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2007 9:44 am 
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Location: McKinney,TEXAS
Hi Ron-
There are many organic amendments you can apply to help rebuild your pasture. You don't mention anything about a soil test being done, do you have one? What type of soil do you have, I assume it's sandy.
There are three things that make up the properties of soil; they are physical, chemical and biological. I believe that as you improve the biology of the soil, the other two will improve. Given that, I have been spraying my pasture with liquid compost. I graze goats, not cows, which have different needs on pasture.
I would recommend you contact someone like Betsy Ross from Sustainable Growth Texas to discuss your situation. http://www.sustainablegrowthtexas.com/
She has cows and sells grass fed beef. She also treats pastures with liquid compost and consults all around the state. I have no financial interest in her business but she is a friend of mine.
Mark Chapin is a contributor to this forum and has a pasture restoration/fertilizationservice.
Please take the time to as much research as you can before you take action. It will save you money and time.
Tony M


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 Post subject: Pasture rebuilding
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2007 11:16 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 10:10 am
Posts: 3
Location: Ennis,TEXAS
Tony,

Thank you for your reply.

We have tilled the soil and sent the soil samples off for testing, but I am still awailting the results. Once I get the analysis back, I need to apply the correct amounts of soil improvement mixtures so I can disc the pastures one last time prior to the sprigging.
The soil is kind of different and ranges from blackland to sandy, almost in streaks. I guess I'm on the edge of where it changes from black land to a sandy loam.

I really need for these sprigs to take off. I can't afford to wait to replant again next year.

Thanks again,
Ron


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2007 11:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 7:18 pm
Posts: 48
Location: Hawkins,TEXAS
We would be happy to help you with your pastures. We have local Dealers in your area. You can find out more about us at www.WatsonRanchOrganic.com.
Thank you.
Brad Watson
903 858-2030


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2007 11:32 am 
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Joined: Tue May 10, 2005 10:18 am
Posts: 114
Location: Southeast Dallas County/Balch Springs ,TEXAS
Ron,
Not sure if you're interested, but Mark is scheduled to come out to the shop tomorrow to teach a class on just what you are looking for. Give us a call today - the weather has been poor and I am guessing farms are located further out than you all want to drive to North Dallas = but we can sure re-schedule. My shop is in the moving process and we'll be relocating to Balch Springs, right off of I-20 and 635, perhaps that will be easier to get to?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 2:12 pm 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
I guess it's already too late to take Tony's advice of doing nothing until you do some research.

Please talk to Betsy about getting started. She's going to try to convince you to use compost tea, but...from what I've read, the single most important thing you can do is to put your livestock on it, like YESTERDAY! Then worry about the details of moving them around and improving your grass. The cattle know what to do (eat and fertilize).

But since you have already plowed, you may not even have anything for the animals to eat. In that case you're going to have to spend money to restore the pastures to something cattle can eat off of.

I would also talk to the people at Douglass King Seedin San Antonio about what to plant and how to make sure it grows.

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David Hall
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 Post subject: Pasture
PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 6:09 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 6:00 pm
Posts: 219
Location: Hubbard,TEXAS
Our place is in Hill County, next to Navarro. After we got our soil test back, we had 1000#/acre of fine ag lime applied to the soil. But it was not plowed.

Good Luck,

pakin


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 Post subject: pastue
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2007 9:33 am 
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Location: Whitesboro,TX
I hope your soil test was not from A & M. The one
down in the valley with K Chandler is the best. You
don't mention if you have hard pan - if you do a
chisel plow (never use a mold board plow) is best to
get things going - it was the
best thing we did on our property. You need to add
humates - 200 lbs to the acre is best. This will chelate
any toxins and add trace minerals - with out trace
minerals nothing much will happen.
I don't like coastal as it is hard to establish and in
time it will revert back to common bermuda. With
my wholestic progran with trace minerals my common
grows almost as tall as coastal and it comes back quickly.
Doing one section at a time is good on pocket book
but don't forget to do MIG on the hundred acres - including
the 20 acres you are doing. This will give all grasses
a rest and it will force the cows to eat some weeds. Get
Joel Salatin's book on "Salad Bar Beef" pastures - www.acresusa.com
The last thing you want is only one type of grass - the
more the better for the animals health.
Robert D Bard


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:10 am 
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Location: Holland,TEXAS
Just a side note, Coastal does not revert back to common. Coastal is a sterile hybrid and only propagates from roots and rhizomes. That is why it has to be sprigged. The seeded types of Bermuda can revert back over time by "cross breeding" with common.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 10:06 pm 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
I think he was talking more about common bermuda being more of a dominant species rather than a genetic reversion. For example in San Antonio if you plant a single sprig of St Augustine in an otherwise bermuda lawn, "it will revert to St Augustine" as long as you water it. St Aug is a dominant species.

But anyway I wonder how this project turned out???

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