It is currently Wed Sep 28, 2016 11:03 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 12:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2003 11:59 am
Posts: 15
Location: Argyle,TEXAS
I am building a house on 5 acres in Argyle. My wife has a horse and we might add another one. I know very little about horses or their diets but I love to plant things for birds, butterflies, and bees! What do I need to avoid planting? What might already be growing that could be toxic to the horse? Of course I hope to keep the horses mostly in pasture, but I want to plant things around the edges of the pasture to increase biodiversity.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2007 12:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 6:00 pm
Posts: 47
Location: Hubbard,TX
I know there are plants that are toxic but I can't remember them. I just don't worry about it. In the summer there is something my palomino eats that makes him sun sensitive and his white/pink nose burns. Johnson grass under the right conditions can be a problem. Something about a toxin building up during dry periods.

Please understand just about anything you plant, the horses will eat. Keep them in pasture away from your landscaping and everyone will get along. Generally as long as the horses aren't starving they'll eat only what's good for them I believe.

Congrats on the new house and expanding your herd.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2007 4:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 10, 2005 10:18 am
Posts: 114
Location: Southeast Dallas County/Balch Springs ,TEXAS
Dr. Reagor at the A&M vet clinic in College Station can likely steer you in the right direction. He was the vet who advised me regarding the blue green algae problem with my pond a few summers ago and he is very knowlegable. Sorry, I don't have his direct no. with me, but I'm sure you can find him on line through the A&M website.

There are many plants for horses that can be a problem, and yet when given over a long period of time in slow moderation with other things, I've seen them eat without issue. But I'm sure there are a few red flags. One that comes to mind is Lantana - I think they know to stay away from that one, it grows wild in the pasture and even the cows stay out of it.

_________________
Marie Tedei
Eden's Organic Garden Center
http://www.safe-gardens.com
214-348-EDEN (3336)
Your Paradise Found


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 3:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 6:43 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Austin,TEXAS
Wow - I just had to put down a 7 year old gelding because of something he ate. Initially it was thought he had colic, but when they scoped his stomach, he had a massive "growth". When we sent it off to TAMU, it turns out he ate a blister beetle (how many I don't know) and this ruptured his stomach! From what I've read, this is a problem in alfalfa and when it flowers, the beetles go after the flowers. Their toxicity stays alive even after the beetles are dead and baled. I have 4 other horses, none of which were afflicted, however.

My family raises horses and cattle - they also have a ton of lantana, which both species stay away from. From what I recall, lantana is toxic, but in the Texas Valley it grows tremendously and the livestock don't bother it.

Good luck with adding horses to your home! I'd not trade it for the world!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 11:07 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 3:12 pm
Posts: 111
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Try this, http://www.manesandtailsorganization.org/toxic.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2004 11:48 am
Posts: 62
Location: Kemp,Texas
http://www.thecattlemanmagazine.com/iss ... /toxic.asp


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 3:24 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Good stuff - good question. The lady who operates our stables does not mind us feeding Johnson grass to the horses as long as we hold it and only let them bite six inches or less. She is worried about them getting 3 feet of it into their intestines and binding. She gets this from her sister who has a master's degree in animal nutrition, so I'm passing it along at least 4th hand (FWIW). Hopefully someone else can corroborate.

_________________
David Hall
Moderator
Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by eWeblife