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 Post subject: New Pecan Grove
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2004 2:24 pm 
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Several topics on my mind, thanks in advance for any information. I live in Northeas Travis county (New Sweeden) on 70 some odd acres. I am planning my retirement and ways to use my land to provide several cash crops. First on my list is a plan to plant a pecan grove with the idea that in ten years it will be ready to produce. What sort of things sould I include in my plan? Where are my best resources for information to design the project for optimal results as it relates to organic production of this crop and how can I best incorporate it into the overall use of the total land available?


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 Post subject: pecan tree
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:20 pm 
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Location: Whitesboro,TX
They may not be all organic but the people at Womack nurseies in De Leon, Tx know about which trees belong in the northern part of the state, and which should be in central Tx vs the southern part of the state.
Robert D Bard


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:40 pm 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Take a vacation and drive to San Antonio to talk to Malcolm Beck for an hour. He will suggest a bacterium to put into the holes with the trees as well as mulch recommendations. He might even suggest certain companion plants (otherwise known as weeds) to grow with the pecans. And certainly he will recommend periodic beneficial insect releases. If you make a few key mistakes, you might have a dead field in 10 years. Talk to Malcolm and get the info first hand.

If you plan to get a soil test, which I only recommend if you are in the ag business, get it from K Chandler at Texas Plant and Soil Labs.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2004 9:20 pm 
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Location: Dalhart, Texas
I wonder what kind of bacterium and companion plants. Dchall, do you know of a book written by Mr. Beck or a book on this topic? Unfortunately, I do not have much free time to set aside so I can "walk on over to San Antonio" to have a talk with Malcom. :wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:48 am 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
I'm going to shoot from memory on this. The bacterium is available commercially and is called Actinovate. If you have a chemical laced soil, you should wait a year and work on getting soil microbes growing. The Actinovate only works in organic soils. The bacterium in Actinovate will destroy the microbe that causes cottony root rot and may be effective in controlling root knot nematodes. Cottony root rot is the major cause of Texas fruit and nut groves not living and producing to their full potential. Malcolm treated three apple trees in an apple orchard in Medina, Texas. The entire orchard was wiped out by CRR after just a few years of production. Malcolm visited the site of the orchard after they closed down and found that the three trees he treated were producing just fine in a sea of dead trees. He has the pictures. As I recall the roots of the trees need to be treated when planting. If you want an organic orchard in Texas, you will regret it later if you do not talk to Malcolm one way or another. Find out what it would cost you to get him to visit you. Whatever it takes :shock: :shock:

Another orchard grower tried using mulch to keep as much moisture on the property as possible. He found that he never needed to water because of the mulch. Think about the difference in your profit margin when you have an irrigation system versus not needing one. Irrigation systems first of all cost money, they need spare parts, they need to be housed in a building when not in use, the require your labor to hustle them around, plus you have to pay for the water. Ask Malcolm how much mulch that grower used. I know but I'm not telling. Ask Malcolm. He's got pictures.

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