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PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2005 12:03 pm 
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I have always used spent coffee grounds in my compost as well as mixing in with cm, dried molasses, etc. when I spread on yard and I think it is a good thing.

I have many lbs of awful coffee beans that I have no desire to ever drink and I was planning on spreading it out in the yard when the time is right. Now, do I need to soak it in water much like the spent grounds were or can I simply use it as is? I didn't know if that would be too potent or not. Any comments on this are appreciated. Thanks!

Second question: Where is a good schedule or calendar to alert organic gardeners when it is time to put out the necessary supplements? I think it is time for CGM, but early for molasses and other nutrients. Is this true and is there a calendar for this?


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2005 12:24 pm 
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Location: The Colony,TEXAS
> I think it is time for CGM, but early for molasses and other nutrients. Is this true and is there a calendar for this?

No, its not quite time for CGM, if you want its anti-germination effects. The window for that is usually Feb 15- March 15. Howard recommends the first fertilization in January.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2005 10:35 am 
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Well it might be time for CGM where ever you live. I thought they were going to fix this forum so that you HAVE to put your location in your profile before it would let you participate??? What happened to that???? I'll ask the other moderators.

Anyway, if you live in South Texas, then it probably is time. If you live north of Corpus, probably not. We just can't know until we know where you live. I can give you a schedule for San Antonio but you would have to adapt it to Sioux City, or Fairbanks, or Miami, or New York City, or where ever it is you live.

I don't think you need to soak the beans in boiling water. Just grind them and use them at a rate of 10-20 pounds per 1,000 square feet. Or a handful scattered under each shrub.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2005 10:03 pm 
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Sorry about that. I live in Wylie, TX just outside of Plano and close to Dallas. If you read this I have one other quick question. I took a soil PH test and confirmed what I already suspected. I have fairly high PH at 8+. I don't know where to access sulfur and I have read that it would require massive quantities to even reduce the PH by 1 point. So, I purchased some gypsum. Is this the right direction to take in lowering the PH to a more suitable level?


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 Post subject: pH & Soil Health
PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2005 11:59 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TX
I'd quit worrying so much about the ph and work on getting the soil life active. If you do that the pH will generally accommodate itself. Have you put down any molasses, cornmeal, humate, compost? If the soil is in a healthy state, the chemistry tends to work itself out. If you listen to folks who have been working on this issue for a long time, including Howard, you won't hear them mention that much. It isn't that it's not relevant, it's just not the most important factor. It is an indicator.

Am I helping? Hope so!
Kathe :D


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2005 10:09 am 
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Ok and you are right. Rarely do they talk about PH. This is the start of my second full year at 100% organic. The soil composition is literally hard alkaline clay. I do put out molasses and corn meal, but with no noticeable results. That being said, most people I talk to about organic gardening suggest you don't notice much until the second and third year. I intend to utilize more humate and compost this spring and summer.

Yes, your comments really help. I am just at my wits end with seeing most of my chemically dependent neighbors with gorgeous green yards and gardens with very little energy spent. I don't mind putting in many hours because I enjoy that part, but I also really want to see some results.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2005 8:10 pm 
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My soil is pulverized limestone. I don't know what my pH is but everything seems to be growing. You might keep an eye on the color of your turf grass. When it becomes yellowish, grab the greensand. This usually comes up right after deep penetrating rains.

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