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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2005 9:31 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 6:00 pm
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Location: Hubbard,TEXAS
I know the rule of thumb is that there's no bad time to use organic products, but I'd feel better to get someone's opinion on spraying the pastures.

There appears to be a few days toward the end of October that we can get this done. Does anyone think it could be a problem so close to our usual first freeze by Thanksgiving? Would it overly activate the microbes at this late date?

Thanks for your opinions,

Pat Akin


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2005 11:57 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
While the air might freeze, the soil never freezes down here.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2005 3:03 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 6:00 pm
Posts: 219
Location: Hubbard,TEXAS
Thanks for your input. We'll go with the spraying. We had one-half inch of rain Sunday night--much needed--that, with the spraying, should help the 15 acres of Elbon Rye planted for winter cattle forage.

Pat Akin


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2006 1:43 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 7:44 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Red Oak,TEXAS
Am about to spray Compost Tea on soybeans with a boom sprayer. Does anyone know the following:

1. What sort of pump should be used? Presently have a Hypro roller-cell pump on the spray rig, but suspect that the rollers will smash a lot of the little microbe-buggars in the stuff. Am contemplating a Hypro diaphragm pump. Do you have any actual knowledge concerning this?

2. At the generally recommended rate of 20 gallons/acre, this will require the next-to the-smallest ConeJet nozzle (TX-2) that TeeJet (Spraying Systems) makes. Have to use this small size, as can run only at two-to-three mph (or less), due to having to straddle the rows (with some precision) with the tractor tyres. This size of nozzle requires a 100-mesh screen. Is this too small for Compost Tea?


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2006 9:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 7:44 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Red Oak,TEXAS
Dear Bluestem,

Thanks for the feedback. Ordering a Hypro 9910-D70. Am applying with a boom due to the winds, down here. Would like the stuff to hit the ground and then still be wet if it gets there....

Everything I read says apply at the rate of 20 gals/ac for soil drench - do you have any better suggestion?

I am a rank amateur to all of this, so may I ask the following:

Do you make your own tea (any details)? If so, what maker do you use?

If not, what do you buy?

And, what are you raising?

Your advice is appreciated.

Cordially,

Frank

P.S.: How did you know that 100 mesh = 149 microns? As a simple technician, I am always interested in these things...


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 Post subject: aerated compost tea
PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2006 10:51 am 
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Posts: 420
Location: Whitesboro,TX
I have been using a 200 gal stock sprayer with roller pump with 100 gal / 10 acre and it is fine. The bugs will not be harmed.
The biggest thing it ti feed the little critter. If you spray them once a month with corn syrup or molasses it will not be to much. The more corn syrup we spray on field the less that our children or grand children can consume in some processed food or drink.
Robert D Bard
Dr Bob the Health Builder


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