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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 2:19 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 2:08 pm
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Location: cedar park,TEXAS
Hi! Enjoy Dr. Garrett's books and radio show and have a question for you experts.
We are looking at purchasing a 40 acre piece of property that is currently being farmed for cotton and maybe rotated with corn. There is a hand dug 15 to 20 foot water well on it also. We have done some checking but are told by EPA and the actual chemical fertilizer & defoliant companies it is all ok as is. We have also talked to the county agent. We have 3 little kids and don't want to realize later that they were wrong and have permanent damage. I have read what you have to say about de-toxing, but wanted to check if it will work for cotton defoliants & anything else used on cotton, like what if DDT was used? We are having a hard time finding a lab to test for toxins that isn't a huge environmental company that will charge $15,000. (Edinburg lab suggested by Dr. Garrett said they can just check for nutrients). We have read & been told that older pesticides like DDT are less toxic but have a LONG residual effect & don't metabolize as easily & the more recent pesticides are more toxic but don't have as long of a residual effect, and metabolize out of our bodies faster (not sure which is worse). We would want to stop cotton farming and put it into coastal fields and have cattle on it and change over to non-chemical/organic. We have been told the following by the current owner (he has only owned it for about 1 year but it has been in his family for years):
"This land has been in cultivation since the early 1900s. The only crops that have been grown on the property are cotton, grain sorgum, and corn. As we discussed, the well is most likely too shallow to be used for human consumption; however, it would work well for lawn watering, etc.after it has been cleaned out by a professional company. Chemicals & fertilizers have only been used since the 1960's. The standard fertilizers have been amonium nitrates, which are used by the plants. Herbecides would be Round Up. Not sure what pestecides are used, however, all chemicals are used based EPA labeling for whatever crops are grown."

We are wondering about the residual effect of the defoliants they are using now as well as any old stuff (like DDT or something). How could we get it tested to see what has been used? Could it even be de-toxified, and would it be economical since it is 40 acres and not just a yard? What about the spray drift effect from people all around us that will continue using defoliant, etc? We would so much appreciate your advice.
Thanks,
Jo


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:38 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 7:18 pm
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Location: Hawkins,TEXAS
Hello Jo,
You can check out our website www.WatsonRanchOrganic.com Our Product called Micro Grow is great at detoxifying chemicals from soil, as are our other products for building up the soil and growing crops! You may find your answer there.
Good Luck,
Bradley Watson


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 10:22 pm 
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All you need to do is stimulate and feed the microbes in the soil and they will clean up any contamination you might have. Different people push different products and different techniques. Some people push compost, others compost tea, others liquid compost, some organic fertilizers, still others natural meals, etc. Truth is - they all work. The variables are time, efficiency and cost. Dry molasses still ranks high because it is so inexpensive and works quickly to stimulate microbes in the soil, and those microbes lead to other microbes. Adding protein along with the sugars makes the processs work even faster. Animal manure products or corn gluten meal are helpful especially to help with the time part of the puzzle. New products about to be on the market have micronized texture and are are laced with helpful microbes. It's easy to do now and about to get easier.

If you are really concerned, to tie up the toxins in the meantime, broadcast zeolite or one of the activated carbon products.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 10:23 pm 
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All you need to do is stimulate and feed the microbes in the soil and they will clean up any contamination you might have. Different people push different products and different techniques. Some people push compost, others compost tea, others liquid compost, some organic fertilizers, still others natural meals, etc. Truth is - they all work. The variables are time, efficiency and cost. Dry molasses still ranks high because it is so inexpensive and works quickly to stimulate microbes in the soil, and those microbes lead to other microbes. Adding protein along with the sugars makes the processs work even faster. Animal manure products or corn gluten meal are helpful especially to help with the time part of the puzzle. New products about to be on the market have micronized texture and are are laced with helpful microbes. It's easy to do now and about to get easier.

If you are really concerned, to tie up the toxins in the meantime, broadcast zeolite or one of the activated carbon products.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 10:41 pm 
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I don't think I've ever completely agreed with everything Howard said, but this time I do (I'm maturing :D ). I can almost guarantee that DDT was sprayed on the field back in the day. You can't know how much but it was used universally for decades. Every home built before the 70s had DDT sprayed around inside and out. If it didn't have houses on it it was a field and was sprayed with DDT anyway. At some point you have to just stop worrying about it and make the best of life. Assuming your children are not eating the dirt, you should be good to go with molasses and any kind of organic fertilizers.

From what I understand about cotton (which is pretty little), I think the defoliant is the least of your worries. You should ask at your nearest feed store for specific details. It will help you to worry less. Get the cattle on the land and get going.

I would go on to suggest you don't worry about getting the latest and greatest seed out of TAMU or their extension service. Just plant whatever the native species are/were in your area 200 years ago. They are the best adapted to growing naturally and for cattle forage. You could check with Douglass King Seed in San Antonio for suggestions. They specialize in that sort of thing.

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