It is currently Thu Aug 25, 2016 10:49 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2003 1:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 10:07 am
Posts: 43
Location: Coppell, Texas
Does anyone know where I can find Dipel Dust in the Dallas area, perferrably near Coppell/Lewisville?

Thanks

_________________
BK


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2003 3:28 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 8:15 am
Posts: 964
Location: Odenville,Alabama
Are you sure you want to use this stuff?
Do you know what it is and if it's organically acceptable or not?

_________________
The entire Kingdom of God can be totally explained as an Organic Garden (Mark 4:26)
William Cureton


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2003 3:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2003 4:52 pm
Posts: 147
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
Captain - Dipel Dust is a form of Bacillus Thuringesnsis..
and - if you look up "dipel Dust" in Google, you can find where to order it from - and what the "Manufacturer's Safety Sheet " says about it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2003 7:16 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 8:15 am
Posts: 964
Location: Odenville,Alabama
OK, that sounds good to me!
Thanks for the info!

I've never used BT in my soil as a biological/parasitic control against grubs. I know they sell it at various farm feed supply stores here in my area. I have relied mainly on good soil management like cover cropping, companion planting, and occasionally shots of diatomeous earth, pyretheum, or neem oil, or even chewing tobacco sprays to fight pesty grubs in the soil in the fall/winter seasons.

_________________
The entire Kingdom of God can be totally explained as an Organic Garden (Mark 4:26)
William Cureton


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2003 8:42 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
I have looked into this pretty well and to my knowledge, the BT in Dipel dust is the strain Kurstaki and only affects caterpillars. It has to be eaten to be effective and is destroyed by UV rays so it needs to be applied where the caterpillars are eating and in the evening so they have time to ingest it. The BT strain Israelensis (sp?) is the one that affects mosquito larvae and is found in the dunks and little granules that are sold all over the place to be dumped in standing water. It's a good organic resource, I think.

However, so far as I know or was able to find out Bt does not affect grubs. Milky spore bacterium will kill several species of them off, though. Since most grubs are beneficial, I kind of hate for people to use it but when they've created a grub infestation it's a lesser of two evils situation and I'd rather see them use that than one of the toxic alternatives. :shock: Hope this is helpful! :D


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: dipel dust
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2003 9:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 10:07 am
Posts: 43
Location: Coppell, Texas
I appreciate everyone's help. I am trying to save my pumkin plants from the squash vine borers that destroyed my zucchini plants this spring. I covered the plants with a "floating row cover" quickly after I saw some of the SVB moths flying around them on Wednesday. I'll use the dipel dust if it looks like the larvae are at work. Thanks for the info and the MSDS, I really want to be careful with anything that I use and the more info the better.

Bekah

_________________
BK


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2003 11:11 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
I had the same initial reaction that Capt had. Why would anyone name a natural product, Dipel? It makes me think first of DIazinon.

How about a nice name like, Peaceful Caterpillar Disease or, Alice's Natural Death Powder. :D

_________________
David Hall
Moderator
Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2003 12:11 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 8:15 am
Posts: 964
Location: Odenville,Alabama
That's a good one, Dave!

_________________
The entire Kingdom of God can be totally explained as an Organic Garden (Mark 4:26)
William Cureton


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2003 5:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2003 12:12 pm
Posts: 110
Location: Garland
Dipel will be essentially useless against squash vine borer. you will need to get a liquid form (made by greenlight, BT Worm Killer, I think its called) and inject it into the stem.

The trouble with Dipel is that the larvae don't eat enough of it before they are inside the vine, where the Dipel isn't.
Another option is to look for the entrance hole with the sawdusty poop outside and dig'em out by slitting the stem length wise and covering the wound with soil when you are done. This has worked better for me than any other treatment, plants look bad for a day or two, but usually recover.

_________________
"A righteous person who is wise resembles God: he never disciplines anyone in order to take vengeance upon a wrongdoing, but only so that the person may be set aright, or that others may be deterred."
-St Isaac of Syria


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Liquid BT
PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2003 7:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 10:07 am
Posts: 43
Location: Coppell, Texas
Where do I get the needle and syringe to inject my plants if they need it? Besides "borrowing" from the hospital?

_________________
BK


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2003 9:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2003 12:12 pm
Posts: 110
Location: Garland
They are probably sold at various nurseries around town. I use one that was originally intended for injecting a deep fried turkey marinade. It has a plastic needle with slits on the sides so that it spreads more evenly along the shaft of the needle. I got it at Academy, (and no, I don't use the same one as for the turkeys I fry... :P

_________________
"A righteous person who is wise resembles God: he never disciplines anyone in order to take vengeance upon a wrongdoing, but only so that the person may be set aright, or that others may be deterred."
-St Isaac of Syria


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2003 7:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 10:07 am
Posts: 43
Location: Coppell, Texas
I went ahead and did surgery today. Almost all of my pumpkin plants had the borers. I also noticed a borer moth flying out from under my floating row cover as I lifted it up to inspect my plants. I am going to try injecting with Bt tomorrow, I did find the syringe at academy, thanks. Does anyone know if these moths produce more than one larvae at a time? I really don't know much about bugs and never imagined I would be opening up plants and evicting and squishing them!!! Yuck!

I also noticed squash bugs, some of them mating. :shock: I think I killed at least 3. I'm going to continue spraying with the garrett juice. Any other ideas?

Can anyone give me basic info on neem oil and rotenone?

_________________
BK


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2003 1:56 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 9:10 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
Bekah wrote:
Can anyone give me basic info on neem oil and rotenone?


I was curious too. Here is what I found:
NEEM OIL
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/biopesticides/ingredients/factsheets/factsheet_025007.htm
Not always a trusted source of information, this I realize.
Azadirachtin (121701) Clarified Hydrophobic Extract of Neem Oil (025007)
These two active ingredients are derived from the oil found in neem tree seeds. Humans have used this naturally-occurring oil for millenia for medicinal, cosmetic, and pesticidal purposes. When used in pesticide products, both azadirachtin and clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil can be applied to many food and non-food crops indoors and outdoors to control certain insects and related pests. Adverse effects are not expected to humans, wildlife, or the environment when products containing these active ingredients are used according to label directions. Labels direct users not to contaminate water and not to apply when honey bees are actively visiting flowers in the area.

Questions and Answers About Rotenone from
http://www.dfw.state.or.us/ODFWhtml/Inf ... enone.html

Q. What is rotenone?
A. Rotenone is a natural substance contained in the stems and roots of certain tropical plants, such as the Jewel Vine or Flame tree (Derris Spp.), Lacepod (Lonchocarpus spp.), or hoary pea (Tephrosia spp.).
Q. Does rotenone have other names?
A. Many products are sold that contain rotenone. Brand names include Derrin, Derris root, Nicoulins, Prentox, Noxfish, rotenone dust, and Timbo powder.
Q. What other uses are there for rotenone?
A. Rotenone is used as a garden insecticide to control chewing insects, …
Q. What happens to rotenone after it has been applied?
A. Rotenone is an unstable compound that breaks down when exposed to light, heat, oxygen and alkaline water. The breakdown process is very rapid. Ultimately, rotenone breaks down into carbon dioxide and water; two common substances.
Q. How long does it last?
A. How fast rotenone breaks down is affected by temperature, light, oxygen and alkalinity. Generally, most treatments are made during summer months.
Rotenone is unstable and will degrade rapidly with exposure to light, heat, oxygen and alkaline water. The presence of ice and snow cover may prolong the toxic effect.
If desired or necessary, a treatment can be ended or toxicity can be removed by adding oxidizing chemicals, such as potassium permanganate or chlorine, to accelerate the natural breakdown of rotenone.
Q. Is rotenone likely to enter ground water and pollute water supplies?
A. The mobility of rotenone in soil is low to slight. The expected leaching distance of rotenone in soils would be only 2 cm (less than one inch) in most types of soils. An exception would be in sandy soils where the expected leaching distance is about 8 cm.

Hope this is what you were looking for in regard to "basic information". :wink:

_________________
Nadine Bielling
Moderator
Gardener Exchange Forum

The Laws of Ecology:
"All things are interconnected. Everything goes somewhere. There's no such thing as a free lunch. Nature bats last." --Ernest Callenbach


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Apr 10, 2009 1:58 pm
Posts: 144
Location: Arlington, Texas
With regard to squash bugs, our zucchini and yellow squash were nearly wiped out last year, until we started treating with orange oil.

Here's where I took my info from: http://www.dirtdoctor.com/organic/garde ... n/id/1369/

It only took a few days for us to see a noticeable difference in our plants. Unfortunately, we had lost the zucchini, but a lot of our yellow squash made it after we started treating with orange oil.

I have been hoarding orange peels all winter so I can make my own (which is not as strong as what you buy commercially, but it still worked!) this year.

We may still have to buy some, but it's worth it.

Also, we know what we're looking for now. When the squash bugs started their feasting last year, we didn't even know they existed. All we knew about were squash vine borers.

We're definitely going to be watching for the first adults to show up in the spring this year and SQUISH THEM!!! :evil: :evil: :D muahahaha!!

Also, take a look in the Texas Bug Book so you know what the squash bug eggs look like. I even found them on my morning glories! Squash those whenever you find them, too.

Happy gardening!

_________________
God speed!
Cara
**
Take time to stop and smell the flowers!
(or... as my ladybug refrigerator magnet says
"take time to stop and eat the flowers!" :D)


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife