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 Post subject: Grubs
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 8:22 pm 
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I have grubs in saint augustine lawn. They have eaten a lot of roots. When do they stop feeding and when is the best time to put out nematodes in east Tex area. I just recently broadcast about 20 lb dried molasses which I understand should help.
Thanks for any suggestions :?:


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 Post subject: Re: Grubs
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:38 am 
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You can put out the nematodes now. If you have a rain, do it right after, or water and then spray them around the yard. If you have a bright sunny day then do it early or late, not in the bright sunshine.

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 Post subject: Re: Grubs
PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2014 12:33 pm 
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The best time to put out the nematodes is when you see beetles swarming your porch light in May or June. If you do not have swarms of beetles, then you likely will not need beneficial nematodes for that year. The beetles are the buggers that lay the eggs which become the grubs. It is uncommon to get an infestation of grubs two years in a row, but it is certainly easy to look for the signs.

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 Post subject: Re: Grubs
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:12 am 
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Just joined the forums today! I was planting some new plants and came across several grubs as I was digging the holes. Is there a "brand" of nematodes that work best or are they all the same? I have Bermuda grass and there are several places where the grass no longer grows if you can believe that!


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 Post subject: Re: Grubs
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 12:36 pm 
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There are lots of grubs that are harmless, so unless you're actually seeing damage that can be attributed to grubs, leave them alone. The white ones with the brown head, for example, are probably Junebug grubs, and don't do much damage as far as I can tell. There are others that are a problem, so hold onto a few and take photos to use for identification.

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Take a look at some of the turf care tips that are scattered throughout the site. In particular, the Lawn Care Forum run by David Hall. He comes through regularly and answers several questions at a time, so if you post there you'll get an answer eventually, but do yourself a favor and scroll through several of the pages of questions already raised and you may find something that works for you. Meanwhile, putting out beneficial nematodes will help with some of the pests in the garden and the turf like cut worms and other caterpillar and grub types. (I don't know if they control the Junebug larvae). On those bare spots you may be seeing the result of compacted soil or the result of years of chemical fertilizer use, etc. Aerating, spreading a thin layer of compost, broadcasting dry molasses or corn gluten meal, sprinkling rock powders, there are lots of things that may help that lawn that have nothing to do with fighting grubs.

The point of organic gardening is not to remove every pest that is out there, but to keep them under control with beneficial insects, biological treatments, and organic products. Good luck with the Bermuda - the worst weed in the world (in my humble opinion!)

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 Post subject: Re: Grubs
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 2:58 pm 
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You will never be 100% rid of grubs. The trick is to balance their population so there's enough naturally decaying material around for them to eat and they don't eat the roots of your turf grass. Normally, the rule of thumb is that if you dig down a few inches and a square foot wide and you see more than 6-8 grubs, you may have an overpopulation of them. Nematodes is the best natural solution.

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