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 Post subject: Texas Bug Book problem
PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2003 11:49 am 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
I have a bug on just about everything that is identified in the Texas Bug Book as leafhoppers. My problem is that when I search the Internet looking for "leafhoppers," I don't get any pictures that look anything like the picture in the Texas Bug Book.

The bug I have is pictured accurately in the book. It is a tiny white hopping insect that sort of looks like aphids. It inhabits freshly grown plant stems right under the buds and seems to produce a whispy white sticky thread. I just want to cross reference the picture in the book with the rest of the world so when I ask for help, I can talk to people who can also find pictures. Does anyone know another name for this pest?


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 Post subject: mealy bug?
PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2003 2:47 pm 
Sounds like mealy bugs - they do hop - is this what you are seeing?

Image


or does it look more like this? (there are white leafhoppers)
Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2003 11:59 am 
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THey don't look like either picture you posted. They look exactly like what is pictured in the book. They do hop. They can hop almost three feet away.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2003 9:32 pm 
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I have the first pic critter very prolific in my compost pile. Is that ok?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2003 11:54 am 
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So are we out of ideas for the name of the bug in the Texas Bug Book? I have that white stuff on literally everything in my yard including herbs, weeds, trees, roses, citrus, bulbs, everything but the grass. Surely someone knows what it is. And surely someone affiliated with the bug book could make a correction so the rest of us could look up the bug on the Internet and get help.

I've tried seaweed and molasses with no luck. The white bugs jump off. I've tried orange oil with the same effect other than my sprayer no longer works (I didn't realize the corrosive effect of orange oil). Water works equally well. I've given up fighting them off except on the citrus. The roses may well be toast soon. They're getting black spots on the canes where the bugs were when I wash them off.

Jim in Dallas,
Anything in a compost pile is decomposing, so it is okay. Bugs are only a problem when they are decomposing living plants!! And to get better help next time, open a new thread so people will see your problem up front. And you could post it to the composting forum.


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 Post subject: Leafhoppers.
PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2003 9:15 am 
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Location: Waxahachie,TX
Dchall_San_Antonio here is a link to a site that is dedicated to Leafhoppers. Scary huh an entire site dedicated to them! I am also going to post the image from the main page.

Site
http://www.inhs.uiuc.edu/~dietrich/Leafhome.html

Image
Image

If you go to "Guide to the subfamilies of Cicadellidae" there is a breakdown of the subfamilies with pictures. I hope this helps some. :idea:


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 Post subject: Another Image.
PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2003 9:24 am 
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http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r1301211.html

Image

If I get the right one tell me I am just posting anything that even remotely resembles what you mentioned.


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 Post subject: More Images.
PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2003 9:28 am 
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Here is another url that you should check out. I will not post any more images unless you say none of these are the right one.

http://www.photovault.com/Link/Orders/EntomologyInsects/LeafhoppersHomoptera/OELVolume01.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2003 11:53 pm 
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None of those are the right one. If the bug is not pure white, it's not the right one.

It seems to live on stems and leaves a white cottony mess about 6 inches along the stem. When I spray with water, the white bugs hop out of the white mess (leaving it behind) and onto lower leaves or the soil. They can easily jump 2 feet out away from the plant.

In the Texas Bug Book, the picture shows a Queen Anne's Lace with the bugs on it. Anyone who has the book, look up leaf hopper and you'll see the picture. I just need to know the real name for the bug.


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 Post subject: Leafhoppers?
PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2003 8:05 am 
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Sorry none of those matched. :( I will keep looking. Part of the problem is I do not have the Texas Bug Book so I am having to go off your description of the bug and its ways of moving about. Good luck. :?


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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2003 8:54 am 
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It sounds like your bug problem is secondary to a fungus or bacteria problem. You probably know this already, but leaf hoppers don't cause black spot & like diseases. They are attracted to the plants that are in stress like those that have bacteria or fungus problems. I have had success with this plan of action: First release ladybugs to take care of your sucking insect infestation. Then spray your plants with 1 tablespoon of baking soda mixed with a gallon of water. The next OR alternative step would be to mixhorticultural cornmeal at 1-2 cups per plant into the soil around your plants and water it in. If your plants are too heavily mulched to do that, mix 1-2 cups of cornmeal with a gallon of water, shake it up and let it sit, shaking occasionally, for about an hour. Then water your plants with it, about a gallon per plant. You might pull the mulch away from the trunk of your plants too. I have literally seen improvement overnight with this cornmeal cure. And ladybugs are ferocious! I hope this works for you as you sound pretty frustrated.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2003 9:54 am 
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Location: Garland, Texas
Looking at the Texas Bug Book and reading the identification of the Leafhopper, could the upper right picture reflect the nymph stage of the Leafhopper?
Quote:
Nymphs are very similar to adults, but paler in color and wingless.
The picture (lower right) does appear to reflect a "cottony mass" as you described.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2003 11:47 am 
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Kathe,
I've scattered a handful of corn meal per plant under these roses on the first day of every month this year. In the past two years I used it only one time and got such good relief from both fungus and aphids, that this year I decided to try the corn meal every month. Otherwise I don't do anything to the roses. I still have no fungus or aphids - just thrips and these little white guys. So if they're stressed about anything, it probably isn't the fungus or sucking insects.

Mr Clean,
I'll check the Internet for nymph stages of leafhoppers. These things are white, white. There's nothing pale greenish or brownish about them.


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 Post subject: Leafhoppers
PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2003 4:30 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TX
Dchall,
I have the same "leafhoppers" you describe, and one other variation as well. From Howard's bug book information, I just thought they came in many different colors and sizes. We have been having better luck controlling them with either horticultural oil or insecticidal soap than with some of the other organic recipes. As to whether leafhoppers are to blame for the fungal disease on your roses, Howard does say on page 88 "entomologists say that leafhoppers are responsible for spreading more than 150 plant disorders".

Please send a follow up message as you gather more information.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2003 9:16 pm 
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Okay, I might have the answer. I just talked to Bob Webster. He said they were, in fact, a type of leaf hoppers. He also said that they cause so little damage that nobody really cares about them. Maybe that's why I can't find them on the Internet.

The plants that I had them on 3 weeks ago seem to be free of them and unharmed. The roses seem to be unharmed although I have stopped spraying water on them a week ago. They're worst characteristic is they're ugly on the stems of the plant.


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