It is currently Fri Aug 26, 2016 5:43 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:44 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2003 1:52 pm
Posts: 2017
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
We barely had any "june bugs" this year but now have a large emergence of beetles that I assume are their distant cousins. They are huge (bigger than the june beetles) and have a coppery-green iridescent coloring. They're so big and lumbering they seem to have a hard time stying aloft.

Do they do as much damage to the lawn as the june beetles do in their larval stage? Anything I should be proactive about for next season?

_________________
Sandi
Texas Certified Nursery Professional
Texas Master Naturalist
Organic gardener
Tree-Hugger
Native Texan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:51 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2003 1:52 pm
Posts: 2017
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
Actually, I think I just found some info that answers most of my questions.
Doesn't look like they damamge anything since they go for rotten or half-eaten fruit. We have a fig tree that is constantly dropping rotten and damaged fruit.

http://www.sdnhm.org/fieldguide/inverts/coti-mut.html

From early summer through fall, the erratic and clumsy flight of this large green beetle can be seen. Not common 30 years ago, the beetles have since become very abundant, primarily due to the increased popularity of organic gardening. The beetles deposit their eggs during the fall in decaying plant material, especially in manure and backyard compost heaps.

The larval grubs feed on the organic material and develop quickly. Heat given off by the compost allows the grubs to remain active the entire year. When their feeding is disturbed, the grubs roll over on their backs and inch away, using their body segments, not legs, for traction. During the spring, underground chambers are formed by the grubs in which to pupate. Winged adults emerge a few months later.

The figeater can readily eat overripe or bird-damaged figs, peaches, and grapes, but its weak mouthparts are ineffective in ripping open most other plant material. Native plants, including plant pollen and cactus fruit, are rarely damaged initially by the beetles; they usually are found taking advantage of damage done by other insects.

_________________
Sandi
Texas Certified Nursery Professional
Texas Master Naturalist
Organic gardener
Tree-Hugger
Native Texan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 9:44 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 9:10 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
I realize these might be a pest, but I think they are very pretty!

_________________
Nadine Bielling
Moderator
Gardener Exchange Forum

The Laws of Ecology:
"All things are interconnected. Everything goes somewhere. There's no such thing as a free lunch. Nature bats last." --Ernest Callenbach


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2008 7:23 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2003 1:52 pm
Posts: 2017
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
From what I have read, they really don't do a lot of damage; mainly eat rotting fruit. They are really beautiful.

_________________
Sandi
Texas Certified Nursery Professional
Texas Master Naturalist
Organic gardener
Tree-Hugger
Native Texan


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife