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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 8:27 am 
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Have been a composter for many years. That said recent home soil test shows the Potash to be high.

Information indicates the high potash will raise soil ph - started with 8.1 5 years ago and well water ph is 8.1, have been adding some sulfur into the flower/garden beds along with home made compost.

What is best way to level the NPK as the addition of hummus/ compost is too slow - don't have a century of time remaining to correct the soil.


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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 9:46 am 
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Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Where are you? What kind of soil is typically in your area? Despite the soil test readings, how does your garden actually grow and look? Did you get the soil test because of a problem, or out of curiosity?

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PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 7:41 pm 
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Azle, Tx. Test was done by home test kit. The areas tested were in the lawn adjacent to fairly young trees ( the areas from which the samples were taken also had a lot of water well cuttings on top from when water well was drilled about 5 years ago- lots of gray shale), slightly amended with homemade compost. The actual garden and flower beds have been heavily amended with compost. Plan to test of those beds very soon.

The soil in the area varies widely from sand(sugar sand) to brick red clay and gray clay mix in the upper strata, deeper is caliche. We have a lot of brick clay, will have to locate Texas A & M soil test done about 5 years ago and compare the results- that test was prior completing the bed/garden amending as we had just moved here.

Also forgot to mention ph with this test was between 7 & 8.

Thank you for your response


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PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 10:14 pm 
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The lab that Howard recommends can be found here:

http://www.dirtdoctor.com/Soil-Testing-Lab_vq2119.htm

Texas Plant & Soil Lab
5115 W. Monte Cristo Rd.
Edinburg, Texas 78541

Phone Number: 956-383-0739

And here is discussion about the lab and what they do that is so different from home kits and other labs around the area. And on that page, it says:

Quote:
TPS&L uses the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Extraction Method which is accurate for any soil type. This method duplicates the natural extraction method used by plants in the ground. Plant roots excrete CO2 in combination with soil moisture to form a weak carbonic acid that solubilizes nutrients for root uptake. Accurate soil testing which duplicates the plant's actual nutrient extraction method is essential for helping achieve maximum production potential from crops.

The Natural Organic Warehouse (NOW) offers Test Packages from Texas Plant & Soil Lab which includes recommendations and solutions to maximize production, beauty and profit for those doing commercial growing. Once the test results are completed, NOW can help with product recommendations ranging from a single product up to a comprehensive, long term program. Order your test kit today or call 888.998.9669 for more information.


You can ask that they send a copy of the results to Howard and he'll be able to tell you more about what the results mean and what you can, if needed, do about it.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 16, 2013 7:16 pm 
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Northwesterner is right. Use the soil test recommended by Howard Garrett. The one by Texas A&M is not all that accurate due to the way they conduct the test, from what I understand. Texas Soil & Plant Lab is the name. It is in Edinburgh, TX.
I just found a link:
http://www.texasplantandsoillab.com/contact.asp

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The Laws of Ecology:
"All things are interconnected. Everything goes somewhere. There's no such thing as a free lunch. Nature bats last." --Ernest Callenbach


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