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 Post subject: Bug ID - Friend or Foe?
PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:09 pm 
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This little guy has big back legs and striped antennae. Jumps when threatened, otherwise seems pretty bold, will turn toward the viewer and sway back and forth as if to say "bring it on!" Probably 3/4" to 1" long. Is he a beneficial? Thanks!


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File comment: Couldn't get a clear shot; hopefully body shape helps to identify...antennae diverge.
120712_bug photo.jpg
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:10 am 
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It almost looks like a couple of different things. A katydid (no ovipositor, so it would be male), but the body doesn't look long enough. The back legs are too long for it to be an assassin bug. Someone will come along and name it.

As for the photo, if you back up a bit from the bug and position yourself over the leaf he's on so there isn't another plane that the lens will autofocus on, and center the lens on the leaf and the bug, you'll have better luck. And by backing up the lens is more likely to be in focus (digital cameras have a little "tulip" symbol for closeup, and you can use that for a real close shot, but you still have to be careful about the plane you're shooting at).

I figured this shot would work because the bug was at about the same plane as the leaf. I stuck it in because I enjoyed watching this guy on the okra.

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Okra-Mantis-Jun21-2012-crop1a.png
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:31 pm 
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Thank you for the info and photo tips! Just using an iphone so not sure I can do much better, but here is another...


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:33 pm 
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Much better - someone ought to know what it is.

What is it doing? You can see the predatory bugs interacting and eating other insects if you watch for a little while. Likewise, you can tell if they're responsible for leaf damage if you consistently see them near eaten spots, if not in the act.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 8:25 pm 
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Good idea! I will observe and report back! Thanks again.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 7:28 am 
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It looks like it could be a Praying Mantis to me. If it is, they are very benificial...


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 7:45 am 
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It's a katydid.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 9:32 am 
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Thanks - I think the nymph stage just has the shorter body and it gets the more distinct shape as it gets older.

The good thing is that when you find pests at a small size I find they're easier to knock out with the orange oil or neem sprays.

It isn't a praying mantis - the small ones are identical but tiny versions of the adult. The mantis photo I posted above was an example of how to take the photo close up, it wasn't put up to indicate that it is a problem. They're very beneficial.

Here's a closer look at an adult katydid:

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File comment: This photo came from an Ohio blog: http://jimmccormac.blogspot.com/2007/08/they-only-come-out-at-night.html
Texas+Bush+Katydid,+Kiwanis+Park,+Franklin+County,+Ohio+August+25,+2007+(8)[1].JPG
Texas+Bush+Katydid,+Kiwanis+Park,+Franklin+County,+Ohio+August+25,+2007+(8)[1].JPG [ 28.65 KiB | Viewed 1814 times ]

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 2:14 pm 
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Thanks everyone! Hadn't seen katydids in the nymph stage so this helps. Time for neem!


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 2:20 pm 
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You can use Surround WP (kaolin clay in a suspension) and treat it like grasshoppers. Neem clobbers some plants in hot weather, where
as the Surround just coats things with a white powder that chases off grasshoppers and katydids. I don't know the price, but I'm guessing it's less expensive.

You have to broadcast this to get bugs that fly and jump so well because they'll be all over the yard and garden.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 12, 2012 9:26 pm 
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I presented a similar photo to Howard in person. It is difficult to say what this may be as it is in the in-star stage of it's cycle and therefore, the id may not necessarily be determined. BugGuide.net is a great resource for reasons obvious due to the domain name.

Also, keep in mind that there are really no "bad" bugs. When left to her rule (which she always somehow manages, one way or another), mother nature keeps things in check with all living things.

On that note, please contact your city, county , neighbors and everyone you can to say "No, they can't" to aerial spraying! I regret some people have suffered and died due to West Nile Virus, but far greater are the number of people who will suffer from such spraying. It has been proven that the mosquitoes will proliferate from such action. New York is one of the places who has learned the hard way that spraying pesticide is NOT the answer.

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