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 Post subject: tree trimmings mulch
PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2004 3:44 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2004 10:13 am
Posts: 26
Location: Hewitt,TEXAS
I use tree trimmings from my local refuse center in Hewitt, and I have always had good luck.

I just picked up a load and it is heavy on the leaves. There are chuncks of wood, but it seems there are more leaves than anything. It has started composting. It smells rich and the leaves are decaying.

Is this still an acceptable mulch for beds?

Thanks for the tips.

Dave


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 Post subject: leafy mulch
PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2004 5:38 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2003 6:45 pm
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Location: San Antonio,Tx
ddossey,

I think I'd let that continue to decompose and run back out there for real mulch.

If the load you brought back is not completely decomposed it will take away from your beds.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2004 7:45 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2004 5:07 pm
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Location: Argyle, Texas
What do you mean by it taking away from the beds? We had one of those tree trimming trucks drop a big load out back and I've used some mulch around trees and in my garden. I was thinking it would work to just cover the bare ground, block out weeds, etc. I thought it would be the same as using store-bought wood mulch. Did I mess up?
thanks much,
Julie


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2004 7:20 am 
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Location: Argyle, Texas
I think I can answer atleast part of my own question. I was pulling weeds this morning and noticed that I have more of the same weed than usual, and I'm pretty sure it's little mesquite trees in my raised veg garden :( Guess that's one reason to let the pile cook before using it.
Julie


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 Post subject: Mulch vs Compost
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2004 7:52 am 
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Julie,
Sorry for not making myself clear on the subject.

Compost is mulch that has decomposed to a high grade dirt so to speak.

Mulch is made up of chipped tree limbs to various sizes to cover the dirt and compost to keep them cool and moist while keeping the weed growth down.

I doubt that the little seedling growth you see are from the mesquite tree unless you know that the mulch/compost you brought in contained a lot of mesquite beans.

From your free brush/mulch site try to bring in the chipped bark material that is a "fine" grade vs "course" grade. It will be easier to work with in your garden.

Store bought mulch is cleaner and is usually made from a single source where as from the brush site it's made from what ever is brought in. On the positive side for free mulch, it's made from the materials from your local area.

Hope this helps a bit more.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2004 8:56 am 
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Location: Argyle, Texas
Thanks. I understand it better now.
Julie


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 Post subject: take away from beds
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2004 9:24 am 
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Location: Hewitt,TEXAS
Zipper,

Thanks for your reply. I'm not sure I uderstand how partially decomposed material will take away from my beds. If I'm thinking about it correctly, won't store bought mulch be partially decomposed material after it's been down awhile? Not trying to argue, just want to understand your point.

I did find in one of HG's early books that leaves made "good" (not excellent) mulch because it was the best earthworm food.

Thanks.

Dave


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 Post subject: Decomposition
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2004 12:38 pm 
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Dave,

From what I understand from other is that to breakdown mulch it takes energy away from the soil.
This is also why compost is applied to the top of the soil and not tilled in.

I might suggest you find Captain Compost here on the BB and ask him for a better explination than I can. Let me know if he was of help to you.
I think there is also someone call Organic 1.

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 Post subject: Compost and energy
PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2004 3:25 pm 
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Location: Flower Mound
If you don't mind a microbiologist's point of view...the organisms that break down the organic matter in your compost pile require quite a certain amount of oxygen and nutrients to do thier job. Once the organic matter is decomposed, the numbers of those organisms begin to decline and the nutrients are add back as they die. You don't want so much decomposing activity to be going on that it competes with your plants. On the other hand, the forest floor has a good layer of decomposing leaves and the trees manage fine. The biggest issue is oxygen. If the leaves are not making a flat mat, you should be ok...but it they are lying flat to the ground, it will be harder for oxygen to enter.

I hope this helps.


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