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PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:48 pm 
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Location: fort worth,TEXAS
i know that trees here in texas seem to stay 'short', which seems to be a function of the wind acting as a limiting factor. I live on an open, old pasture with a slight hill facing south. it is very windy. does anyone have any thoughts on whether this might be keeping everything from growing? row cover is not really an option, we have too much space under cultivation ... nothing seems to be getting taller. i know it has been cold, but sheesh :roll:

thoughts?
thanks, merri


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 7:47 am 
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
merri-

I still think it's the weather. Consider that we had a really cold first part of April. (Had the FURNACE on! Usually don't even have to heat in March...) You can blame it on the fact that I decided to have a garden. Last time I planted seedlings more than a decade ago, it sleeted the day after.

Be patient-let's see what happens after some 80 degree days.

Patty

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 8:44 am 
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Location: fort worth,TEXAS
thanks patty!

I never thought I would be looking forward to some Texas heat; never say never, right? 8)

I read a lot about windbreaks last night, and might start one for the house and garden anyway...we get a bitter northwest wind that can really come whipping down the hill! The south side of the garden will probably get an ornamental hedgerow type situation.

You have been a dear...and yes, I need to develop more patience!
thanks!
merri


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 7:14 pm 
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merri wrote:
i know that trees here in texas seem to stay 'short', which seems to be a function of the wind acting as a limiting factor. I live on an open, old pasture with a slight hill facing south. it is very windy. does anyone have any thoughts on whether this might be keeping everything from growing? row cover is not really an option, we have too much space under cultivation ... nothing seems to be getting taller. i know it has been cold, but sheesh :roll:

thoughts?
thanks, merri


I find this idea of wind and the size of trees interesting.
I had a friend who lived west of Denton airport. Years ago, at my friend's home, I recall discussing the height of trees around the area. The trees had grown to a certain height and no more. As far as you could see, they all appeared to grow to the exact same height. They even appeared, from a distance, to have been cut straight across the top like a sheared hedge.
I realize different types of trees have a maximum height to which they will grow, but to be exactly the same is a bit strange. Just thought I'd share this observation. Has anyone ever noticed such a thing? :?

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 8:45 pm 
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Nadine!
This tree phenomenon was the first thing I noticed about Texas upon arriving to pick out a house when my ex was transferred here (from NC) in 1999. The only place where there seems to be much height variation is in low lying areas: along creek beds...the dips in the topographic map, you know? I know that stimulation of touch will keep plants short - you can drag a cloth over seedlings in a controlled environment to keep them short. There is a hormone response to the touch. My tree theory is that the wind is acting as the 'touch'.

I worry that this same wind factor is acting on my seedlings. Everything seems to germinate without hesitation, then just stops. Maybe a true leaf or two. I agree with Patty that this year's whacky weather systems could be messing things up, but even plants like radishes, kale and spinach are suffering the same fate, and I thought they LIKED the chill.

Se la, I'm sure each year will get better and better as my soil (and knowledge and experience) get richer!

I sure hope Patty is right!! ...Me and my lack of patience... :roll:
Everyone cross their fingers for me!
thanks,
merri


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:02 pm 
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merri wrote:
Nadine!
This tree phenomenon was the first thing I noticed about Texas upon arriving to pick out a house when my ex was transferred here (from NC) in 1999. The only place where there seems to be much height variation is in low lying areas: along creek beds...the dips in the topographic map, you know? I know that stimulation of touch will keep plants short - you can drag a cloth over seedlings in a controlled environment to keep them short. There is a hormone response to the touch. My tree theory is that the wind is acting as the 'touch'...thanks,
merri


I remember being told that dandelions will just grow shorter if mowed over, but I was not aware about other plants until mint spread into my lawn grass. I began mowing some of the mint and sure enough, it is growing shorter. I did not know that you could train seedlings with cloth. Thank you for the information! I wonder if it has an adverse effect on plants, being shorter. Probably not. Being a shorter human has advantages and disadvantages, but human is different than plant! :lol:

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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2007 9:35 pm 
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Too bad turf grasses do not seem to have this "stunting" trait. :lol:

Ah, my passion for mowing is starting to fade. My yard is becoming more and more garden as time and budget allow! 8)

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The Laws of Ecology:
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PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 9:58 pm 
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Location: fort worth,TEXAS
$*(#&@) MOWING!
Our land is all old pasture, so until we can convert it to garden, mowing is a reality...I feel like I have been riding a bull for the last 3 days!
...and I HAVE noticed that several flowers will bloom at a lower height if you mow them 8) ...At least it all smells so sweet right now!
chat soon,
m


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