It is currently Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:05 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 3:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:11 am
Posts: 55
I would like to recommend this book. Easy read and informative. All who believe or don't believe in Climate Change should check this out.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 27, 2013 10:39 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1835
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
I took a look at the reviews of this title - it appears that while this book makes a lot of assumptions and employs a religious tone that is off-putting to some readers, there is enough history and science that is true, or that feels true, that it hangs together to convince people that climate change is real. Book authors who attempt comprehensive overview of a subject must pick and choose how to tell the story, so there will always be critics who dislike the approach.

Max Oelschlaeger is an environmental philosopher (The Idea of Wilderness, Caring For Creation, and several others) wrote in Caring for Creation that all of the major religions have an environmental component that sometimes needs to be revisited or revived in this modern age. A writer, whether scientist, religious leader, or generalist, needs to reach people where they live, as it were. Max made the case for reaching those who are religious through the teachings of their religious scholars who reveal ancient attitudes within the given church or temple. If Thom Hartmann's book strikes a tone that purists don't like but still manages to convince many people that environmental change is happening and that we can each make choices about how we live that will make a difference, then the book is effective. Clearly most of the reviewers like the book and how the author laid out his premise and drew his conclusions.

I studied environmental philosophy for a number of years and found that a stimulating conversation is being conducted in the world of environmental philosophers. Until that conversation leaves the ivory tower and Everyman has a chance to think about and participate, then the philosophers aren't really doing their job. If philosophic writings are general enough to influence Lisa Simpson, who in turn harangues Homer and Bart Simpson for their non-environmental activity, then the philosophers will have arrived. It has to be discussed everywhere, and there is no one perfect argument to make that happen.

I hope you will read more than one book on the subject of the environment and global warming, and that you'll continue to share your recommendations. There are some really excellent environmental writers, and there are also some excellent writers who happen to include subtle environmental components that are apparent if you look for them, going back decades. I don't draw a distinction between environmental writers who might touch on the land, the climate, or even the economy - it is all jumbled together. The environmental choices we make will cost us something, one way or another.

If you want to read a essayist who touches on many subjects, I suggest you take a look at John McPhee. The environment, the economy, and the climate are commingled in McPhee's writings - he connects a lot of dots. You'll find him in The New Yorker magazine several times a year also.

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:11 am
Posts: 55
I happened to stumble on this book and hoped that it would start some heated discussions on the topic. The religious aspect is interesting in its own right yet not the point of this checking out this book. In my opinion he is frankly pointing out how humans have changed over time to use "ancient sunlight" carbon based energy to increase production and quality of life. It points out the negative to this and some ways we can slow the climate change process. I would recommend this to anyone who wants an easy read with large scale solutions. Thom Hartmann has the ability to reach a large audience just like Doctor Garrett. Both are syndicated shows yet Mr. Hartmann's is politically based and typically has more experience in the economy. By the way Thom Hartmann considers himself a christian so don't let the religious aspects keep you for reading this book.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:11 am
Posts: 55
If soils with high organic percentages are great carbon sinks, then why isn't this mentioned more in the main stream media. Now I must preface this by stating the ocean is the largest carbon sink. The higher amounts of carbon is proving to be bad thing because the happy balance is being tilted in the ocean. Evidence of the lower food chain species are being effected by the higher acid levels in the ocean, which are caused by the carbon turning into carbonic acid. My point is why are we not making more noise about how large scale organic practices will absorb much more carbon from our atmosphere and at a cheaper price than the synthetic practices. This would be a much easier transition than expecting everyone to go solar, wind, geothermal, etc. I know dr Garrett talks about this often. I'm just saying we need more voices stating this in a big way.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 31, 2013 10:07 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1835
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
You should join Twitter and look at all of the voices posting links to great articles on these subjects. Follow those that really speak to you. I have been following some of these folks for several years now, and though I don't get time to read all of it as they post, I can go back in Twitter feed to find those earlier recommendations.

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 31, 2013 11:48 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:11 am
Posts: 55
Who would you recommend following? Like have really only been reciently had my eyes opened to this over the last year and a half. I'm reading and learning as much as I can as fast as I can. It's exciting to learn and hear new ideas on these topics.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 31, 2013 3:08 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1835
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
You can go in and look at the array of people I follow - a lot of science, parks, journalists, etc. (Also some entertainment and friends, so I wouldn't suggest a blanket adoption of all of my interests!)

https://twitter.com/Maggie_Dwyer

Once you see some of those folks who appeal to you, look at who they follow or who follows them, and you'll find a whole linked community out there. You can create lists - I started that but haven't kept it up. I haven't posted as much in the last year, very busy at work, but I'm getting back to more blogging and photography this year (as my job changes) so who knows, maybe you'll learn all about the new bugs in my garden. :)

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife