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 Post subject: Capital Pear problem
PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2003 2:22 pm 
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We have a Bradford Pear in our back yard. Actually it is probably a Capital Pear since it has a narrower formation of its limbs. The tree is 10 to 12 years old, is probably 35 feet in height, and has been in good health until about six week ago. After it lost its white blossums, and the leaves came out, the leaves began to turn brown, and within three weeks, all the leaves were brown and crumbly. The branches are still flexible, but the tree looks dead.

About three weeks ago, I started using Garrettt Juice at the suggestion of one of my fellow workers, And although I have not been an organic gardner, I have now read several of Howard's books, and am a convert.

This week I implemented the Sick Tree Treatment. Two questions, (1) what do you think is wrong with the tree (I now know Howard isn't much of a fan of the Pear Tree family), and (2) am I on the right track for treatment?

R.E. Russell Jr.
Dallas, Texas


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 7:10 am 
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Okay, has anything changed in the landscape this year as opposed to previous years? Did you use anything at all on the lawn that you hadn't before? Has the grade changed due to a planting or lawn leveling?

When the leaves changed, what exactly was the transformation, did they go straight brown or did they get any spots, etc before?

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It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succor of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields we know so that those who live after may have clean earth to till.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 8:46 am 
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No change in grade.

Drainage is the same, and the other trees in the immediate area are healthy (two crape myrtles on either side and one live oak) and seem to be thriving (especially since I started using Garrett Juice, cornmeal, etc. as recommended by Howard).

This year I used a higher priced fertilizer (traditional type, not organic, Scots Turfbuilder 27-3-4) just before the problems started. The white flowers had already come out and the leaves developed, and then the leaves started to turn brown at the ends, no spots. Then the brown rapidly worked back toward the limb until the entire leaf was brown and crumbly. The large limbs still seem flexible, although the very small limb sprouts seem brittle.
Thanks, R.E. Russell Jr.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 12:27 pm 
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R. E. Russell Jr. wrote:
This year I used a higher priced fertilizer (27-3-4) just before the problems started.


I would call that your problem right there.

Ultra-High nitrogen can very often cause a number of more tender plants to flush out with all sorts of new growth that is very weak and dies at the drop of a hat.

The sick tree treatment will help get things back on track. Wouldn't hurt to add some Zeolite and/or Dry horticultural moasses to the ground to detow it from that high salt fertilizer. If you haven't already done so, check that the root flare is adequately exposed and aerate the root zone.

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Shepherd of the Trees
It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succor of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields we know so that those who live after may have clean earth to till.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 1:55 pm 
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Thank you.

I have already sprayed with liquid molasses. On the root flare...the dirt was pulled back, but I have cedar mulch on top of it currently. Should I leave that or remove it also?

Should I look for the tree to live and come out next spring?

Nothing will go on our yard and it's contents except natural organics from hence forward!!! I suppose it is the one good thing that has come from this expericence.

Again, thank you,

R.E. Russell Jr.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 2:27 pm 
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It's best not to have any mulch actually on the trunk. Cedar in the root zone will help, just don't make it too thick.

As to survival, if you got to it in time, it may well leaf out any time, but I'd especially keep an eye on it come fall. There's a good spurt of growth these trees should put on in the fall after summer's heat has died down.

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Shepherd of the Trees
It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succor of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields we know so that those who live after may have clean earth to till.


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