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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 3:25 am 
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Location: DALLAS, TEXAS
According to the arborist, the sudden leaf loss is due to the heat (100 + in Dallas). He didn't think the excavation I did was the culprit.

I see dramatic leaf color today! It's clear that the arborjet/ deep root organic feed is working! I suspect it's the arborjet injection. Their claim is the nutrient injection is fairly fast (they call it "readily available). The tree hasen't fallen, so it may recover. The arborist said I may not see significant improvement for 1-2 seasons.

I want to repeat: two other tree companies said to cut it down. I will keep posting here with updates.


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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:33 pm 
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It looks like it has suffered, that is for certain. The part of the girdling root that was doing the damage is still in place, until the tree grows large enough to enclose that root and move beyond it, so it's the sick tree treatment that is going to have the most beneficial effect on recovery.

Keep your fingers crossed!

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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 3:26 am 
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I posted a July 4th, 2012 pic. of the tree at
http://dallastexas.ezhoster.com/GIRDLED ... _TREE.html

Comparing the June 24th photo to the July 4th pic. boggles the mind. It's clear to me that girdled trees DO have hope and a good tree service can save the day.


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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 9:42 pm 
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That's a distinct improvement. Good job!

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 Post subject: POST GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:16 am 
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I have pics. Oct.-Nov., 4 months after root removal. PTS did a fall feeding oct. 15.

http://dallastexas.ezhoster.com/GIRDLED ... _TREE.html
Updated site 11/4/2012

I haven't watered in two months. We've got significant rain on al least two days since September. Worried about leeching the organic mix past the roots??
Leave starting to fall, but the majority still green and intact.


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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:59 am 
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This oak is a red oak, correct? What is the habit you usually observe? Does it lose leaves in the fall (now) or does it hold onto them over winter and drop them in late winter or early spring?

It seems that the reaction to a shock of this work might be what you're seeing. Baring a destructively cold winter that could skew the outcome, I'd guess the proof of all of this work will show up in the spring when the tree leafs out.

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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 3:33 am 
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The tree is some form of live oak, I was told when I bought it. Prior to the tree service work, she would retain leaves throughout the winter. The leaves didn't stay full green, like some laurel oaks in the neighborhood. The tree never dropped all the leaves, but most changed to brown. I've had the tree since '90, and I think this is the latest in the season that it is still green. Shes been girdled for some time.

I always wondered what type of tree it is. There are southern live oaks, coastal live oaks, virginiana (which is what the leaves most closly resemble), some names start with a Q. To this day, I'm not sure.


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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:56 am 
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If you can get close to some leaves and send photos, and some of the acorns (live oak tend to have more elongated oval-shaped acorns) that would help.

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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:11 pm 
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Nobody has ever tried to identify the tree, thanks!

Tree gall. I actually thought they were acorns!


Attachments:
house 002.JPG
house 002.JPG [ 70.89 KiB | Viewed 833 times ]
house 011.JPG
house 011.JPG [ 177.82 KiB | Viewed 833 times ]


Last edited by djbeckett on Thu Nov 22, 2012 10:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:42 pm 
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Yup. Looks like a Live Oak! Good photos - that lump looks nasty, doesn't it?

Quercus is the Genus name for the tree, and the species name is virginiana. There is a Central Texas variety Q. fusiformis but what I read says it is smaller tree. (Here is some Oak information: http://texastreeplanting.tamu.edu/ViewAllTrees.aspx?let=O). I won't go further in spelling out the oak tree family - they've moved a lot of tress around from one family to another since I studied forestry!

Have we discussed the drainage in your yard? We did talk about watering, but perhaps there is something going on with the accumulation that has also caused stress, not just that girdling root.

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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 3:11 am 
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Thanks for the identification! I have seen info. about the species you write about. I'll look further for that specific type.

We didn't talk much about drainage, although another contributor suggested excessive watering in one of my first posts. Based on that, I quit using impulse sprinklers, which hit the trunk with every pass. I switched to a pattern sprinkler that keeps water from puddling around the base. I also reduced the water time, starting around June of this year. I never watered more than once a week, but I would put out several hours of water that day.

We're getting into areas that I know little about. I always assumed the tree needed a thorough watering once a week given the Dallas Texas summer heat. The other contributor did comment that trees don't need that much water, they'll find it on their own.

I can hardly wait for next years growing season. In the meantime, I will follow the posts and link you provided.


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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 7:55 am 
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That other response also noted that mature trees don't usually need extra landscaping water. It sounds like you have have been overwatering this tree a lot, and the girdling problem might not have come to light if the watering issue hadn't made the tree look bad.

Do try measuring, or research what the rules of thumb are for your type of watering system. Several hours for a typical urban yard sounds excessive. An hour is a lot, and don't some of those landscape watering systems only go 20-30 minutes a zone?

One of the sites I came across yesterday that I didn't link talked about says http://www.onlinegardener.com/trees/Live%20Oak,%20Texas.pdf:

Quote:
Like most trees, live oak thrives on moist well-drained soils. However, this species tolerates urban conditions including compacted or severely disturbed soils. Live oak tolerates drought conditions and root problems that lead to moisture stress. It is also tolerant of salt spray, which makes it an exceptional species for coastal plantings. Live oak is intolerant of excessive soil moisture due to poor drainage and excessive irrigation. Phytophthora root rot is prevalent in wet soils especially when live oak is growing in heavily irrigated lawns.


You can see that you've set up conditions opposite of what this tree thrives on.

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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2012 4:34 pm 
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It's finally clear to me that you cannot dig a hole and plant. I did several things wrong, including too much water, planting flowers around the base (I see that referred to as a mulch or dirt volcano, the piling-up of material around the root collar).
I just took from the pot and planted. The fact that the tree was in a small pot probably contributed to my troubles. It was a 8' tree/1.5" Ø trunk in a 8" pot, the roots had to be following the container contour.

I attached another photo. I follwed directions and applied 3" of cedar mulch (mid-2012), about half the drip line diameter. I've cleared dirt from the root collar, changed watering habits, and employed a tree service.

I'll stick with this discussion and let everyone know what the tree looks like next year.


Attachments:
File comment: That's me and mom. She bought the tree for me in Whiteright, Texas in 1993. Cannot tell too much from the pic.
Monday__July_30__2007__2__400x354.jpg
Monday__July_30__2007__2__400x354.jpg [ 39.36 KiB | Viewed 787 times ]
001.JPG
001.JPG [ 211.25 KiB | Viewed 809 times ]


Last edited by djbeckett on Sun Nov 18, 2012 2:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 3:06 am 
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Is a tree ring recommended? My mower catches the mulch, and the St. Augestine grass is trying to spread into the mulch zone. My plan is to remove another foot of grass around the mulch Ø and add landscape edging..........


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 Post subject: Re: GIRDLED TREE
PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:00 am 
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Location: DALLAS, TEXAS
As promised, here is a April 2013 pic. Branch ends still not producing leaves, what to do? I've been told that clipping branch ends produces a "fingered" growth at the cut (several sprouts grow from that cut). I think entire branches have to be removed.

Nice growth, though!! Root zone Spring feeding coming next week.


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house 002.JPG
house 002.JPG [ 234.23 KiB | Viewed 718 times ]
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