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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:48 pm 
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I live in a house on a 2 acre lot with a 10 acre empty field behind me and a large empty field to the other side. One of the properties is for sale "commercial" and the other one may be soon. I have a few blackjack oaks and some fruit trees. I want a very large, evergreen screen. I have recently planted rows of Silver-berry bushes on my perimeter and I know they will get 15-20 ft and form a decent hedge but I wanted a second level made of trees to plant behind the hedge to diminish future light and noise pollution. Arbor Day Foundation and some catalogs offers Giant Sequoia’s for zone 8 (I am in Bartonville just north of Flower Mound) but I am truly doubtful if they will grow in Texas. I have thought of clumping bamboo but my wife does not like their appearance.

Does anyone know of any successfully growing Giant Sequoia’s within a couple hundred miles of DFW? If so, does anyone know who sells them locally?

If not, can anyone recommend dense evergreen trees I can plant close together to form a 40-50 ft high barrier? I would prefer trees that are medium to fast growing.

Thanks


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 5:38 pm 
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No, Sequoias don't live in Texas. Most of the tallest evergreen shrubs I am familiar with get about 30-40 feet, like Savannah Hollies. If you want up to 50 feet tall, there are many other trees; Oaks and Maples that would do well.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 9:26 pm 
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Might they have been metasequoias? Those are also called Dawn Redwood and they will grow here.

Metasequoia glyptostroboides. One of those scientific names that by the time you memorize it in Botany class you'll never forget it. :)

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 10:20 pm 
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Thanks. Dawn Redwoods I thought were deciduous? I will look into the hollies or maybe live oaks will help.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 10:33 pm 
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Sorry - I parsed out your question and thought you were asking a different question. Yes, dawn redwood is deciduous.

Holly is a good one for an evergreen, or you could plant Italian cypress. Those certainly grow tall and if close enough together, dense barriers.

Image

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:49 am 
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Dawn Redwood is zone 5-8 so I doubt it would like our summers and drought conditions very much.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:17 am 
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It's a tree that Howard recommends on the radio program. I called in several years ago because I had one in my yard that wasn't doing well. It was just at the time when he was discovering that trees planted incorrectly didn't thrive. It had the classic problems - roots girdling the trunk, too deep, and I hadn't soaked and unwrapped the roots, and it died. I've been thinking about planting one (correctly) in the back yard. I think it has a narrow enough crown that it wouldn't crowd overhead lines. But it wouldn't work as a hedge.

Back to the orignial question, photinia is evergreen (Howard prefers Chinese photinia over red-tipped) and grows fast. It is a very plump hedge, so be prepared to lose a lot of space in that part of the yard.

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