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PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2013 9:41 am 
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Location: UT Zone 6
I'm hoping to plant a few evergreen trees and I know what I want from sight (in my neighbor's yard) but don't know what the variety is to ask for at the greenhouse.

I'm in Zone 6 and looking to see if anyone knows the name of a skinny/tall pine tree? I've attached a picture-


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:01 pm 
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Some kind of a true fir, but you need to get closer to it to make an ID a bit easier from afar. That shape is very distinctive, for someone local, if it is a native tree, the shape is probably the strongest indicator.

I take that back - the top has a kind of hemlock look. Definitely need to get closer to a branch so we can get a look at it.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2013 5:01 pm 
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Location: UT Zone 6
Here are the up close shots.

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2013 11:25 pm 
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I've given this more thought - it's either a spruce or a fir. If you grasp the branch in your hand and the needles are really sharp, it's a spruce. If it's softer, not painful, then it's a fir.

Fir branches have various shapes - the needles might extend out each side, a horizontal arrangement like the grand fir:

Image

or they might be a different shade and shape - not quite horizontal from the sides an needles on the top of the twig, like the noble fir:

Image

Here are a couple of pages to poke through and see if any of the images fit the tree you like:

This page has links to fir trees - it is a comprehensive list of species and varieties of Abies (fir) trees. I don't know where it comes from or what the languages of the pages are, but as long as the tree names are in Latin you can copy it and search for more of them in Google to see if it matches your mystery tree.

This Google search is for true fir trees.

Different types of of spruce trees.

This is a blue spruce twig:

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 9:05 am 
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Thank you!


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:56 am 
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Let us know if you figure it out. If the tree has made any cones, then a cone and a few inches of the branch taken to a good nursery should answer the question. And if you find a cone and post a photo here, it would also help exponentially. It may not be old enough to be making them yet, though.

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