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PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 9:56 am 
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I plan to plant Ballclover on Black Land Prairie in Delta County Texas. The suggested PH of clover is 6.5-6.7. My soil test shows 6.1. Any suggestions? How critical is the PH; 6.1 vs 6.7? Will clover grow but not thrive?

The test is a single site and not a composite of the five acre plot. Nothing has been added to the soil and nothing planted on the area in decades. It has been covered with native grasses. And, I don't plan to do more than shred the field before adding the clover seed.

I need the clover for nectar and pollen for bees.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:59 am 
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Why introduce clover if it's just for nectar? There are many other native wildflowers and perennials that can provide nectar without altering our disappearing blackland prairie. I can give you lists of plants.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2012 6:41 pm 
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I appreciate the feedback and the support of the black land prairie. Most of my property remains in native grass but I have a need for five acres of ballclover or another clover variety. I likely will revert to native grasses in a few years on this parcel but I have new bees in a county where row crops (herbicides and pesticides) exist.

At this time, however, I need a haven for the new bee hives to thrive where I have known nectar and pollen resource for 4-5 weeks in the April - May time frame. And, I want clover honey from these hives. Later, other hives will be placed and produce from unknown nectar sources and, therefore, will be labeled wildflower honey.

I would appreciate some information regarding the impact of PH on ballclover; 6.1 vs 6.7. And, what amendments might be suggested to change the ph.

Thanks


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:39 am 
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Compost will raise your soil ph, so will wood ash or lime.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 2:26 pm 
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I knew about lime but was not sure about the others -- Any idea about the quantity needed to raise the ph .5?

Thanks for the help


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:46 am 
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http://www.dirtdoctor.com/Wood-Ashes_vq4508.htm

You may want to poke around the "library" also to find add'l info

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